Partridge Questions

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Coopacabana, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. Coopacabana

    Coopacabana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So the chicken genetics calculator has a pattern called 'Partridge' (e^b/e^b) and a pattern called 'Partridge Multiple Laced' (e^b/e^b with Pg/Pg (laceing)). I've always called the Partridge Multiple Laced pattern just 'Partridge'. Is there a less wordy name for the pattern? Penciled? Should it be Brown Penciled and Silver Penciled rather than Partridge and Silver Penciled? What is an example of the calculator's Partridge pattern (e^b/e^b with pg/pg (no laceing))?

    And then, is the lavender gene dominant over the blue gene? Because I thought it would be really neat if the blue gene was dominant and you had the partridge multiple laced pattern with the blue gene making the black parts blue and the lav gene making the brown parts lemon, so the bird looked like this:


    I'd call it 'Blue Lemon Partridge Mult. Laced' or something.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    And the breeding of these two would result in 25% isabel partridge mult. laced (since they didn't have the blue gene) 25% Splash Lemon mult. laced (two copies of the blue gene) and 50% Blue Lemon mult. laced (one copy of the blue gene).

    Maternal(Blue Lemon P.M.L.)






    Paternal (Blue Lemon P. M. L.)


    e^b, Pg, lav, Bl

    e^b, Pg, lav, bl
    e^b, Pg, lav, Bl

    e^b/e^b Pg/Pg lav/lav Bl/Bl




    e^b/e^b Pg/Pg lav/lav Bl/bl
    e^b, Pg, lav, bl

    e^b/e^b Pg/Pg lav/lav Bl/bl

    e^b/e^b Pg/Pg lav/lav bl/bl


    But you could also get the color with the inhibitor of gold gene (ig) which is ressesive and therefore more difficult to 'use' or the dilute gene (Di) which is dominant and therefore best for this project, i think. With these you'd get just lemon p. m. l. instead of isabel. Where would you get the ig or Di gene from for a blue lemon penciled or p. m. l. orpington project?
     
  2. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    Buff Cochins, Buff Orpintons, Buff Wyandottes.... that´s where you will find Di, you need to isolated first..
     
  3. Coopacabana

    Coopacabana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay, so what is the pattern, or coloring, underneath the Di in buff orps? What color are they on the calculator? How do you isolate it?
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012
  4. Coopacabana

    Coopacabana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    what about the champangeblond gene (Cb)? it's dominant, too. Does anybody know what the buffs are on the calculator??????
     
  5. Coopacabana

    Coopacabana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    And the lav gene is dominant over the blue gene, right?
     
  6. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The lavender gene is a recessive gene, but it is epistatic over blue. meant is that if a bird is lavender and blue at the same time it looks lavender, hiding the blue.

    e^b without Pg is a very rare color, so most people also call the penciled form "partridge".

    Buff is not fully explainable by the known genes.
    In the calculator you best use Db/Db and Co/Co , allthough not all buffs have Db.
    The pictures look like buff columbian so the description text is leading.
    There is a hyperlink "about buff" ;)

    Champagne blond gene is not well documented and the evidence is very thin in my opinion.

    The gene that you want to lighten the gold groundcolor would be the recessive ig (inhibitor of gold or cream/lemon)
     
  7. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Genes are not dominant or recessive over different genes; it is the various alternatives of a single gene that are dominant or recessive. Since gold and silver are different variations of the SAME gene, there is dominance. Since lav and blue are entirely separate genes, there is no dominance. In a bird who is both blue and lav, BOTH genes express, and the nature of blue (primary patterns) causes the outcome to look more like a blue than like a lav. You will have the darker head, hackle, etc. of a blue. Without breeding records, it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to distinguish between a bird who is blue and NOT-lav.

    Buffs are a very complicated genetic recipe, unlike blue or lavender, which are about as simple as it gets. There is a link "About Buff" that will give you some information. Additionally, you might want to read through the link on Basics.
     
  8. RedReiner

    RedReiner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I dont understand anything about genetics or genes for the most part, but this is what I got with splash over buff in orpingtons. English import on the splash. over in the english orp thread they just told me what she is, blue partridge.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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  10. RedReiner

    RedReiner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank You! English import orpington. pretty nice type. fits in the english standard more so than the US standard
     

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