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Pasty butt and something else... Help please!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kemcconnell, May 16, 2016.

  1. kemcconnell

    kemcconnell Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2014
    I need some advice please! I have a 2.5 week old baby chick who has pasty butt pretty bad. I've been cleaning it and I've separated it from the rest of the littles. It's vent looks like it's much higher up and closer to tail feathers than the rest, too. What products can I add to food and/or water to help get rid of it?! It also appears to be wobbly on its legs now where it wasn't before. Could the two be related?!

    Another chick has what appears to be a bulging bubble on one side of its neck but is acting normal and eating or drinking. I'll try to get a pic later. I did notice it making some odd head and neck movements last night as well. Anyone ever seen or heard of anything like this?

    I'm going to the local feed store after work and need to k le what to pick up for the pasty butt issue! Any help would be much appreciated!!!
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    St. Louis, MO
    Any probiotic like plain kefir or yogurt will help.
    I use Gro2Max with all chicks and haven't had pasted vent since I started using it.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  3. Incukahlan

    Incukahlan Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 17, 2012
    Phoenix, AZ
    Ask your feed store what type of electrolyte/vitamin powder packs they carry. There are many different types. You simply add the measured amount to their water and it gives them loads of nutrients, vitamins, and electrolytes to give them a boost. That could be nothing but beneficial. We typically keep all of our newly hatched poultry on it for the first couple weeks.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    St. Louis, MO
    vitamins and minerals - in moderation - are never a bad idea
    However, baby chicks with a healthy broody hen get probiotics from her feces. Without a hen, you need to provide probiotics in their feed.
     
  5. kemcconnell

    kemcconnell Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2014

    Suggestions for a certain "brand" of probiotic?
     
  6. Incukahlan

    Incukahlan Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 17, 2012
    Phoenix, AZ
    Probiotics are great too. But birds do not possess the right enzymes to process dairy and yogurt can cause digestive issues and diarrhea. Best and safest to stick with other things.
    Here is a link to a popular probiotic supplement for birds.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=as2&tag=thechichi-20&linkId=OPSLEUDMS4CHPK6R

    That is a big one, there are several other options. But super convenient when you can get it right online. Hope this helps.
     
  7. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    As I suggested in my first post.
    http://www.gro2max.com/
    It was developed in Egypt and is formulated specifically for chickens.
    True, chickens are not mammals. Nor would they naturally encounter dairy in their diet. Also true that they don't have the enzymes to digest lactose so large amounts shouldn't be fed.
    However, yogurt and kefir contain the same symbiotic community of bacteria and yeasts that benefit the poultry gut including lactobacillus, acetobacter and lactococcus which are also found in fermented feed.
    I add kefir as a starter in my fermented feed blends and have been doing so for about 4 years.
    It is best to use goats milk, raw milk or whey if added to increase protein for chicks or broilers and you can't use too much.
    In addition, before the advent and inclusion of synthetic amino acids, milk was added to poultry diets, especially chicks because it contained the essential animal based amino acids needed for proper growth. Milk has been used in poultry diets for hundreds of years.

    https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/livestock/production/poultry/poultry-rations-and-feeding-methods.html

    I finish all my cockerels on a milk and grain diet prior to slaughter.
    Normally I do this by mixing whole milk powder with the feed.
    The animal proteins and fats aid growth and improve flavor. This is another old time technique that has been done for centuries.
    Regulations for growing the famous Bresse chicken in France require milk and milk products to be part of the diet.

    http://www.rungismarket.com/en/vert/portraits_producteurs/vuillot.asp

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16268109

    Recommended by the Maine Organic Farmers Association " Milk is a good source of protein and can be fed instead of water for half the day, with water available the other half of the day."
    http://www.mofga.org/Publications/M...r/Summer2003/Chickens/tabid/1481/Default.aspx

    more recommendations for feeding chickens milk
    http://eggs.ab.ca/farming/farming-by-dog-rump-creek/youre-feeding-buttermilk-to-your-chickens/
    http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/chickens-are-omnivores-its-no-dilemma/
    http://articles.extension.org/pages/69065/feeding-chickens-for-egg-production
     

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