Peafowl Ivermectin dosing

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by isuperman35, Dec 9, 2013.

  1. isuperman35

    isuperman35 Out Of The Brooder

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    What dosing do I need? I have two six month old peahens. Have Ivermectin (1% cattle/swine injectable) and want to mix in water. I have checked "Peafowl" threads and several of the worming threads. Still confused....Would appreciate your thoughts on the dosing numbers. Thanks
     
  2. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

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  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I use Ivermectin for mites, not worms, 'cause a study I read said the it's considered an ineffective wormer in poultry. I wouldn't recommend putting it in water.

    Valbazen (albendazole) - 20mg/kg (~.2ml per 2.2 pounds) by mouth and repeat in 10 days. This dose should be effective against all but tapeworms and gapeworms

    Safeguard or Panacur (both fenbendazole), liquid or past - Per my vet for cecal worms is 50mg/kg (.5ml per 2.2 pounds) by mouth and repeat in ten days. This dose should be effective against all but capillary worms, tapeworms and gapeworms.

    Safeguard or Panacur (both fenbendazole), liquid or past - According to a study when given at 20mg/kg (.2ml per 2.2 pounds) three days in a row is effective against most worms, including tapeworms and gapeworms; capillary worms were not mentioned.

    Other published info I have read says that fenbendazole is effective against capillary worms when given 3-5 days in a row, but I'm still trying to figure out what the ideal dose is for treating the capillary worm.

    You should read these:

    I can provide links to the studies and published info if you're interested.

    Hope this helps,
    Kathy
     
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  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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  5. destinduck

    destinduck obsessed with "ducks"

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    I edited my post. Best bet. call your vet. However I personally use 1cc applied directly on the skin of adult birds twice a year and always at least one month before egg laying begins.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2013
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Yes, always a good idea to consult a vet, but do your own research, too, 'cause many vets aren't up to date on wormers and worming. If they suggest a wormer, ask to see where they got that info, and if you have it, show them articles and published studies you have found, talk about it. When I asked my vet about wormng for capillary worms she pulled out a book that said ivermectin at .4mg/kg was the recommendation, but I have seen a study that suggests it might not be effective and then there's the article from the UPA forum provided in my last post that says it's not effective in treating capillary worms.

    My goal is to come up with several treatment plans that are 100% effective in treating cecal and capillary worms.

    -Kathy
     
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  7. Trefoil

    Trefoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kathy- thanks for posting. I just wanted to say. I have been worming my peas usine safeguard in their water for 3 days and again 10 days later, followed in 14 days by pour on ivermectin 3/4cc between their wings. One of the tests done on the bird I took to the vet last spring was a fecal for worms and the vet said my regime was working. This year I will be using valbazon (?) instead of the ivermectin to reduce the chances of immunity. Your links are always useful. Again, thanks
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    One of the bits of info that I'm currently looking for is what is necessary to check for capillary worms, 'cause one website or post said that you had to let the poop float for many hours, another said you had to use a centrifuge, so when my vets do my fecal in a matter of minutes and say "all clear", I really wonder, lol.

    Bottom line, if people don't have unexplainable illness, death or other problems in their flock and they're happy with the quantity of fertile eggs, I'd go out on a limb and say that their worming program is probably working. [​IMG]

    -Kathy
     
  9. zazouse

    zazouse Overrun With Chickens

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    Ya know i also wondered how the vets do a fecal here because the last pup i got had been to the vet 2 days before i got her and the vet said she was worm free but i wormed her anyway just for good measure and she was loaded with tape worms and round worms, now if she was tested and said to be free of parasites then where did all the worms come from in just 2 days? [​IMG]
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I've read and I've been told by vets that false negatives are common.

    -Kathy
     

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