pecking unmercifully..

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by amartinlb, May 6, 2009.

  1. amartinlb

    amartinlb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2009
    Jersey Shore
    My poor easter egger was pecked bad between rump and tail. I put neosporin then blu cote on and put her in cage in coop. Talked to someone with a lot of chickens they said put bag balm on her and let her be with the other chickens, once they tried they would not do it again as it tastes horrible and they would not peck. Well, I did what he said, overnight no problem. At lunch today came home to check and she was laying on the ground limp-they had pecked her so bad she is going to die - totally limp. I put her back in the cage so she can go peacefully.[​IMG] Hope this never happens again to the others. I do not know who started it but they were all around her when I went to rescue her. I know it happens but don't like it
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2009
  2. amartinlb

    amartinlb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2009
    Jersey Shore
    My son thinks he identified the pecker. He saw the largest Ameraucana peck at a slightly smaller ameraucana above the tail feathers, and after he inspected that victim and another smaller ameraucana he saw evidence of pecking and he put the large ameraucana in a dog cage for now.

    Any ideas for putting the one very bloodied up pullet out of her misery? I made a topic here for that: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=176742
     
  3. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    You would be surprised at the recovery powers of a chicken, assuming the wounds are not in the eyes or deep in the vent. If she will drink (?) electrolytes might bring her back. I'm so sorry you received poor advice. When attacked they need separation for quite a while, or the bully needs relocation.
     
  4. lisahaschickens

    lisahaschickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 25, 2009
    Vancouver, WA
    One of my EE chicks was attacked by a hawk at just under 7 weeks old. It smashed her to the ground but I caught it in the act and chased it off. She was bleeding from the mouth and went limp and unconscious in my arms when I picked her up. When she woke up, she coughed blood all over me and then was in shock the rest of the day and night - just sat there, droopy, wouldn't even take water from a syringe or anything. Not even a drop. I was convinced she was going to die. But, I took her inside, kept her warm and quiet and safe and by the next morning, she was standing up and drinking and by mid-day she was eating and she went back in the coop after about 36 hours gone.

    Now, I know your girl is worse off than mine was and if you feel she is suffering terribly, I fully support your decision to end her pain. However, I mention this because I have read so many stories on here of amazing chicken recoveries. Chickens have gotten one or both wings eaten off entirely by predators - bone sticking out, etc, and recovered and lived long lives with no wings. Others have been torn up to the bone - even head injuries down to the skull, and recovered. So, if you can't stand the thought of losing her, there may be hope. But again, we all understand if you don't think she can possibly make it and you want to end her suffering now. It is a brave choice to make.
     
  5. lisahaschickens

    lisahaschickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 25, 2009
    Vancouver, WA
    p.s. I am also sorry about the bad advice to put her back with the other birds right away... they see blood and go for it and they can sense weakness and will often pick on a weak or bleeding bird to the death. chickens are ruthless. If one is injured and bleeding, it is best to separate it until it is strong enough to hold its own.
     
  6. amartinlb

    amartinlb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2009
    Jersey Shore
    We had her separated for a few days with blu-kote added daily but we were told yesterday bag balm will also help heal and if any of the chickens peck they will get a bad taste in their mouth and stop. Now we know to wait until it's 100% healed up I guess...

    The suspected bully is separated from all of them now.

    The injuries on the victim are pretty bad, they are all over her back and buttom side and I see some deep punctures or lacerations (or whatever you'd call chicken peck marks, but it's very bloody and raw).

    She isn't interested in eating or drinking, seems very week and right now she's sitting by herself in the shade in the yard not moving at all with her head down. I don't think it's worth it to try and rear her back to health now considering how much pain she appears to be in...

    Let me know what you all think. I'm thinking it's best to put her out of her misery and to do my best to not let this happen again...

    -Anna
     
  7. lovemychix

    lovemychix Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 14, 2008
    Moulton Iowa
    I know the feeling. I have one seperated now. I even spent $20 on the rooster booster products. [​IMG] I've tried bluekote too. They won't leave her but alone. She doesn't seem bothered by it but I am going to try to get her feathers back in. [​IMG]
     
  8. amartinlb

    amartinlb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2009
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    Also as an alternative to Roosters since our town doesn't allow them, would a few gigantic hens like Jersey Giants hopefully help maintain peace?

    Or, with bantam roosters, will they also prevent pecking and are their crows just as loud as standard roosters?
     
  9. lisahaschickens

    lisahaschickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 25, 2009
    Vancouver, WA
    My thought is to bring her inside to keep her out of the elements, if you choose to try to nurse her. A nice, quiet box or cage in a room all by herself was the advice I got. My girl didn't eat, drink, peck, peep, move, nothing for many many hours. Everyone kept telling me to give her water with vitamins through a dropper but she just let it run off her beak. I was convinced she was going to die - unknown internal bleeding and no water for hours and hours. Not good. But, she pulled through.

    If she is still alive now and if she doesn't get an infection (antibiotic ointment may be good), you never know, she could make it. Like I said, there are some amazing stories. But, with all those open wounds, she is at high risk for infection, which really will make her suffer. It is truly your call, as she is your bird and only you know what is right for her and for yourself in this situation.
     
  10. Damummis

    Damummis Chickenista

    Apr 29, 2009
    Mid-Coast
    I had to cull my daughters BR on Easter because she was ruthless with the pecking. I fitted the rest of the hens with peepers that you can get at eggcartons.com so that if by chance they learned the same behavior from "Ducky" they would stop. Bag balm works wonders on effected areas. All hens "bloomers" are growing back. Hens seem to be doing better.

    I know it is very hard to cull a favorite hen but sometimes it has to be done. I find the easiest way is to lay their neck under a handle of a rake or shovel, step on both sides of handle and pull on feet with a quick upward motion. It is easy and fast. Yeah, they will flap but that is just reflexes.

    As my husband says, "sometimes you have to sacrifice one for the health and well being of the rest."

    Sorry you have to go thru this.... It is very hard. [​IMG]
     

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