Pennsylvania farmer blocked from selling unpasteurized milk outside of that state, but it is okay to

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Bullitt, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sought and received a federal injunction against a Pennsylvania farmer to prevent the farmer from selling unpasteurized milk outside of Pennsylvania.

    The USDA states that the raw milk can be dangerous.

    Can someone explain to me why it's okay for the farmer to sell unpasteurized milk inside Pennsylvania but not outside the state?

    The only thing I can think of is that the federal government oversees interstate commerce, so the federal government can't prevent the farmer from selling within his own state. But I would think if the USDA says it is unsafe that the state of Pennsylvania would also say the milk is unsafe.


    http://news.yahoo.com/farmer-forbidden-selling-raw-milk-013744834.html
     
  2. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In my state, you can't transport raw milk, but you can sell it on site within the state. We pick up raw goat milk from our local goat farm sometimes. Did it the first time just for kicks, but I've gotta say, it's freakishly tasty compared to ultra-pasteurized.

    You have to sign a waiver each time you purchase though about how you understand that it is not considered safe and such.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2012
  3. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wouldn't the raw milk be just as dangerous at the farm as it would be transported to a dairy?

    I am trying to understand the logic of the regulations. Either the milk is dangerous or it's not.

    You seem to still be alive after drinking it. [​IMG]
     
  4. mlm Mike

    mlm Mike Sunna and Mani Premium Member Project Manager

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    Yes, Federal government can only regulate intrastate commerce. Raw milk is generally safe, depending on your age your parents or grandparents probably had it daily.
     
  5. mlm Mike

    mlm Mike Sunna and Mani Premium Member Project Manager

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    The logic of the regulations is the Monsanto owns the federal government, they are in process of getting a patent for the pig. Monsanto wants to own all our food sources, with the help from the federal government.
     
  6. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think you mean interstate. Intrastate is within a state.

    You would still think that if the USDA considers it unsafe that the state government would also consider that milk unsafe.

    Someone seems to be wrong here.
     
  7. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is what I was thinking but I did not want to say it. I think the federal government is trying to protect the market for the big corporate producers.
     
  8. Nitrous

    Nitrous Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The feds are only *supposed* to regulate interstate commerce (because states can't do that) and protection of the nation, interstate highways, and whatnot. Not impose laws that affect the day to day running of the inside of the state. So if PA does not have a law against selling raw milk or diseased cows, the feds do not have authority to step in. If you try to cross state lines, to sell your raw milk/diseased cows, you are now in "Federal" territory.

    So if you break a law in your home state, the state goes after you. If you break that same law and cross state lines, while doing it, the states (both) can prosecute you *or* the feds can, but not both. If the states decide not to prosecute, the fed can step in, unless they decide the reason the states dropped charges is because there was not enough evidence or something was wrong with custody, arrest or guilt.
     
  9. mulewagon

    mulewagon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Real food rots - that's how you can tell it's real. It doesn't do well with storage, and transport, and temperature changes. Okay, there's some exceptions, like eggs, apples, and potatoes. But mostly real food spoils quickly. And milk is a great culture medium. I adore raw milk, but want it the same day it was milked, and use it quickly or freeze it.
     
  10. Sharisr32

    Sharisr32 Egg Killer ;)

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    The USDA began this crackdown after the Apple Juice mess where those kids died - Keeping in mind so many people dropped the ball concerning the sale of that apple juice that they maybe jumping very fast. The US Army sent reps to that plant and they declared it too dirty to be used for Soldiers but public sales continued - Odd - took a while to find that the Apple grower violated his contract with the company and sold Apples off the ground instead of picked only and the ground apples got deer droppings on them being untreated it was a major problem - Frequently people use the "Not Dead Yet Club "example My grandparents did it.. Testing and diagnostics were way less so illnesses caused by unpasteurized items may have gone undetected. odd application but public safety maybe their rational ----
     

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