People from california/people that know about political parties, HELP!

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Mrs. Green Thumbs, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. Mrs. Green Thumbs

    Mrs. Green Thumbs Chillin' With My Peeps

    So I am registering to vote today in our up coming ...whatever it's called. I don't do politics... I don't talk about them, I don't think much about it all unless it has something that directly affect's my personal life... Well I didn't, of course now I'm 27 and I'm beginning to realize that not only do I have a vote but that even if I don't affect the political world... the political world can and will affect my world. So here I am filling out my California voter's registration and I have it all done besides this one teensy question...


    "Do you want to register with a political party?"

    Umm... ok well I don't know what I am or what to check. I'm voting yes on prop 19 so I guess I'm a....umm.... is it called liberal? any way's can someone help me out here? My step dad say's I'm a Democrat because I'm poor and only the rich people are republican's..... [​IMG]
     
  2. The Chicken Lady

    The Chicken Lady Moderator Staff Member

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    Republicans and Democrats are the two major political parties in the U.S., but there are others. I'm sure someone can point you to a website that outlines the beliefs of the different parties and you can decide which fits you best.
     
  3. thebritt

    thebritt Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 5, 2009
    Humboldt County
    I think that if you don't claim an affiliation with any party (dems, republicans, greens, etc) you get a ballot with all options. If you DO claim a party, you only get to choose from that party's candidates. I used to be registered dem., but I think I changed that so I could have all options.
     
  4. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Mrs. Green Thumbs :

    So I am registering to vote today in our up coming ...whatever it's called. I don't do politics... I don't talk about them, I don't think much about it all unless it has something that directly affect's my personal life... Well I didn't, of course now I'm 27 and I'm beginning to realize that not only do I have a vote but that even if I don't affect the political world... the political world can and will affect my world. So here I am filling out my California voter's registration and I have it all done besides this one teensy question...


    "Do you want to register with a political party?"

    Umm... ok well I don't know what I am or what to check. I'm voting yes on prop 19 so I guess I'm a....umm.... is it called liberal? any way's can someone help me out here? My step dad say's I'm a Democrat because I'm poor and only the rich people are republican's..... [​IMG]

    You don;t have to choose a party if you don't want to. I am in SoCal and I can offer you this: Research the candidates and do not listen to the ads. Jerry Brown, Meg Whitman I believe are going to be the two running for govenor and researching their histories is the only way you will have the facts and not all that BS from the TV ads.​
     
  5. PineappleMama

    PineappleMama Chillin' With My Peeps

    In Texas at least if you vote in the primaries then you'll be registered as that party for the year... which can be a pain if later you want to help someone get on the ballot... if you're registered Dem and want this or that Rep on the ballot, no dice. Only Rep votes matter... and vice versa. Wouldn't have too much a problem with that if they told people, but everyone I've spoken to had no idea they were being tracked and put into categories... not cool.

    I never vote a strait party ticket... I vote for individual people... some day's that R, some it's D, and when a Libertarian is on the ballot (getting more frequent!) I go that way... but it's after I've researched them. I call myself a Libertarian, I am one, I believe in our Constitution and in Personal Responsibility... every stance I have on The Issues stems from those two things... but that doesn't mean that if there's a R or D running that is honorable, decent, trustworthy and has similar goals that I won't vote for them.

    Same with props. You snoop, choose your side, and vote. Just because you voted yes for this or that doesn't mean you will vote yes to all liberal things, or all conservative things. I hate that everyone insists on those labels... gets people in a rut.

    Just vote for what you believe in (not against what you fear) and don't stress.... to that end... have a funny.


    **Inappropriate picture removed**
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 15, 2010
  6. Mrs. Green Thumbs

    Mrs. Green Thumbs Chillin' With My Peeps

    lol Good one! I riginally thought Id register undecided but then I read this on the form:

    NO I don't want to register with a political party. (if you check this box you may not be able to vote for some parties candidates in primary elections)

    Does that mean like presidential elections?
     
  7. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Tempe, Arizona
    I know in Arizona people who are registered as independants (meaning that they choose to not belong to any particular party) can vote in any party's primary (but only in one primary each election). However, that is very definitely something that is governed by state, not federal law. There is probably a phone number on your registration form, or the name of where you turn it in...contact them and ask about your state's voting rules if you register as an independant. At this point, I honestly think that is probably your best choice for right now since you do not know which party best matches your opinions.

    There are plenty of rich Democrats and poor Republicans. A study was done a few years back that showed that there are more wealthy Democrats than Republicans. Anyways, wealth or its lack is not a reason to decide who to vote for. You need to support people and propositions that most closely align with your viewpoint of what is best for the country as a whole and you personally. You need to support people whose integrity you trust. Look at campaign ads, look at voting records, look at stated positions on the issues you feel are important. How often does that person work with the other side to reach a consensus rather than being a party hardliner? For propositions, who is supporting them and why, and equally important, who is opposing them and why?

    The older I get the more the person's integrity is important to me, over whether his/her vision matches mine or not.
     
  8. TipsyDog

    TipsyDog Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 14, 2009
    Aregua, Paraguay
    Mrs. Green Thumbs :

    lol Good one! I riginally thought Id register undecided but then I read this on the form:

    NO I don't want to register with a political party. (if you check this box you may not be able to vote for some parties candidates in primary elections)

    Does that mean like presidential elections?

    If you don't want to learn about our political system, our parties, history, etc., then I would think it is best that you shouldn't be voting! How can you make an informed decision when you live here and don't know anything about how this country is run? We are in deep poop and we could really use citizens to step up and get educated about our country, not just have a pet peeve to vote for and leave the heavy lifting to the rest of us. I find it frightening that someone would not even know our two political parties, at the very least!​
     
  9. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

    20,149
    291
    401
    Jan 4, 2009
    Tempe, Arizona
    Mrs. Green Thumbs :

    lol Good one! I riginally thought Id register undecided but then I read this on the form:

    NO I don't want to register with a political party. (if you check this box you may not be able to vote for some parties candidates in primary elections)

    Does that mean like presidential elections?

    Everyone who is a registered voter is allowed to vote in actual elections. However, is SOME state, voting in a primary is restricted to those who are registered with that party. I do not know California law, so you will have to call and ask that question. Here is Az the official place to call would be the Secretary of Stat's office. If you go to California's official website, you can probably find out who to call and ask, or perhaps even find the information online.

    Okay, this may answer your questions: http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/Outreach/a-guide-to-voting.pdf page 6 discusses choosing (or not) a political party and primary voting.​
     
  10. PineappleMama

    PineappleMama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Personally I think that states can handle their state elections how they want, but that the Presidential election should be handled in one universal way... since it effects the whole country, every state, every citizen, the same way. Unfortunately many don't agree. It makes it darn near impossible for anyone other than a Dem or Rep to get on the ballot in more than a handful of states... Texas being one of them. They give D&R a pass on the rules and regs that are on the books, but anyone trying to break in is forced to jump through hoops, alter deadlines, and so on in an attempt to botch their chances... same thing happens in other states too. So, while a D or R is running around actually talking to people anyone else is spending their time and money fighting just for the ability to run... that's a sore point for me. This country used to be all about choice... make your choices and live with them... now they do everything they can to take those choices away.

    Precisely why I don't vote in primaries (and thus get tagged as this or that party and can't vote for other things)... so that I still have the choice.


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