Petroleum jelly?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by joebwe25, Aug 29, 2008.

  1. joebwe25

    joebwe25 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 1, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Okay. I heard from a source that in winter, you should out petroleum jelly on your chickens comb, and other trimmings, to protect them from frostbite. Is this true?
    Thanks a lot.
     
  2. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    Yep. It can help those large combs from freezing therefore preventing frostbite.
     
  3. joebwe25

    joebwe25 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We don't and they're fine. They do get a black sot here and there though...
    Could that be frostbite?
     
  4. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    In the dead of winter the tips can freeze and break off and you can see dots of black that is dead areas where the tissue was exposed.

    If your chickens have a closed space free of drafts for the coldest nights and some cracked corn to eat to help rev up the body heat during the night frostbite isn't always a problem.

    In super cold places with big single combs and long wattles like on my orp roos they can easily freeze and even have to be dubbed.

    We have had mild winters here but I think we are in for a heavy winter this year. My trees are alreadt dropping leaves. If we get many nights in the teens I will coat their combs and wattles.
     
  5. onebuggirl

    onebuggirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Yes black spots are frost bite and if it get bad enough the comb can completely come off. Just like humans if we have frostbite bad our nose or farthest appendages will turn black and have to be amputated. Please take care and put petroleum on them when it is cold. Is is painful and can cause stress and loss of egg production for some time.
     

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