Pheasant questions

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Katy, May 15, 2008.

  1. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    When my husband was swathing hay this afternoon the swather ran over and killed a pheasant hen who was setting on eggs. He didn't tell me about it until almost 2 hours later when he got home and asked me if I wanted some pheasant eggs. We went out to the field and I gathered them up and put them in one of my incubators. There were fourteen, one of which was broken. The embryo in it was probably 1" long...maybe a little more. How long is their incubation and what do I need to know about brooding them if any of them hatch. Assuming they'll hatch in the next 2-3 weeks I'll have chicks hatching too...can I brood them together?
     
  2. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Most wild species are 23-25 days. I am guessing they are ringnecks? I don't know what stage they would be at because I typically don't even look at my pheasant eggs until they are being moved to the hatcher to pull bad ones.

    Brooding them is similar to chicken babies altho they are more sensitive to too hot and too cold. They fly within 1-2 weeks unless the brooder is deep or covered with something. Keep bedding nice and clean for their little skinny toes or they burn. These are all just things to watch for as I don't mean to scare you or anything....if you care for them well, they will do well.

    I do not brood our pheasants with chicks because they are too wild and crazy and sometimes follow chicks around and peck their backsides. They just seem better in their own space, I guess. My personal feeling about them.

    Jody
     
  3. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    Thanks for the info Jody. They were pretty cool to the touch when I got them. May get nothing out of them, but at least I'll have tried.
     
  4. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    If I get any to hatch, how soon can they be released back out into the field?
     
  5. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I've heard 6-8 weeks is the best time. Got them off to a good start, but also early enough for them to learn their habitat.

    Jody
     
  6. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    Thanks...we'll see how it goes.
     
  7. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    I was reading up on pheasants and if you plan to release them.....

    WHEN SHOULD I RELEASE?

    We think between eight weeks of age is the best age to liberate young pheasants. They are fully feathered, have not imprinted too deeply to human care and can also easily be sexed at this age (if you wish to know how many hens versus cock birds you have). Birds released with critical feathers missing, especially the back and head feathers, will not get past the first hard rain, particularly if it is a cold rain. This one problem dooms more release projects than any other single thing. Those birds must be full feathered upon release. Common sense dictates the release sites should have nearby natural water and feed sources. Also release when there is a reasonable chance for good weather for the first 48 hours or so. You should have began supplementing small grains into their diets at about four weeks old, such as oats, cracked corn, and weed seed (if you can get it) so the birds can easily identify with these important foods upon release. Be aware too that insects in their diet at this age is critical for protein. You might want to consider putting feed out for the birds being released, but remember one thing--they are going to have a hard enough time adjusting to freedom, finding feed and water and avoiding predators, without you providing an ambush spot. If you do put feed out, scatter it, don't provide an ambush area for fox, owls, etc.

    Another consideration might be to hold your birds until spring (mid to late March) depending on the weather, then release them full grown, just before the natural breeding season begins. If you decide to do that, the outside runway pen you have been using will probably be too small to provide enough square footage per bird for them to develop properly. A flight pen will be required and a mature pheasant requires approximately 15-18 square feet per bird (with good cover), anything less promotes feather pulling.

    Here's a link to the rest of the article....

    http://www.michigan-sportsman.com/forum/showthread.php?t=198121
     
  8. Buster

    Buster Back to Work

    Please keep us updated Katy. I'd love to see how it goes. [​IMG]
     
  9. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    Thanks Guirartists for the good info.
     

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