Photos of coop and ventilation questions

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Lucy4, Apr 12, 2009.

  1. Lucy4

    Lucy4 Chillin' With My Peeps

    So here we are, a good portion of the way finished with the coop. Next time hubby is home, we'll put in a window, finish up the front of the run with hardware cloth, build the nesting box and put in the roost.

    I got several helpful responses earlier about ventilation. So here are pics and more questions:

    You can see the top of the coop (roofline) in one pic that we've enclosed in hardware cloth. There will be a wood cut-out to plop in there for wintertime to keep it warmer. The window will obviously be closed for wintertime.

    That said... one still needs ventilation in the winter. You can see a photo of the area between the coop wall and the roof. There's a one inch space all around. It's not totally open, because of overhang from the plastic roofing. My questions are: is that enough ventilation for winter nights? (Their door will be open during the day.) And two: is it safe? There's no wire up there -- DH said it was impossible.

    Sorry this post is so long. I'm obsessing.

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  2. Terri

    Terri Chillin' With My Peeps

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    patandchickens answered my question about ventilation, chickens need alot more than we do. My eves are ventilated plus i have side ventilation the can be closed off in need be(doubt it though i live in the south) plus big windows.
     
  3. Lucy4

    Lucy4 Chillin' With My Peeps

    yes, patandchickens knows ventilation. [​IMG]

    I had DH read pat's ideas for venting; he said that I should ask about the eves before he put all that in. oy. I'm just afraid of doing things wrong.
     
  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Sorry, I forget where you live and how many chickens this is for? If it is just for a couple-few chickens that may be okay. It would be safer IMO to add additional vents, though, in case you turn out to need them what with the clear roof and all (making things more humid during winter daytimes, and just plain old fashioned *hot* during the summer).

    Personally I'm pretty sure I'd expend the (admitted) aggravation on cutting strips of hardwarecloth to staple over those 1-2" slots, as baby raccoons and possums are kind of narrow, and I would not 100% swear a raccoon for sure couldn't rip the edge of the plastic roofing up; but I would not think you are running a *large* risk skipping that wire.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  5. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I saw a possum go through a hole that he had to squeeze his head into...freaked me out as I thought he was gonna get stuck and then I'd have a possum stuck in a hole that it couldn't get out of....as it was, it just flowed through it like it's body was liquid or something, a very impressive and notable sight. I'd seal the gaps/holes.

    Ed
     
  6. Lucy4

    Lucy4 Chillin' With My Peeps

    All right, that answers it. I'll be out there with the hardware cloth later...

    You think if I left open the triangular part in the roofline for winter, that would be too *much* ventilation?

    Pat, it's NYS, an hour north of Manhattan. Cold winters. 4 large breed chickens.

    Thank you!
     
  7. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Guess you can always run an electric line out there for heat in the winter?
     
  8. Lucy4

    Lucy4 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yes, I can. Was planning on doing that next week for nights anyway.
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    If it were me (for whatever that's worth -- there are lots of different ways to do things, of course) I'd make hinged covers for the triangular vents at the gable ends, so they could be open or closed depending on your requirements.

    Same for the slots along the eaves -- I'd cover them with hardwarecloth, but rig something up so that I could close them in winter if/when desired (even just something simple like stuffing rags in the opening from the outside might work in a pinch, although not necessarily the ideal arrangement).

    Build in flexibility now, save yourself a lot of aggravation later on [​IMG]

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  10. Lucy4

    Lucy4 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sounds good. Thanks again for your help!!
     

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