Pics of my Pied goslings

Discussion in 'Geese' started by 8GeeseALaying, Aug 1, 2013.

  1. Since i couldnt find many pics of pied goslings when mine were hatched, i didnt have anything to compare to. Everything that i searched on BYC was either someone asking what i was asking or didnt have pics attached. So im making this thread for people who maybe looking for the same answers i was.

    I have two types of Pied Goslings...
    First is my White Chinese X Brown chinese cross goslings which are still pure chinese, its just a mix of the two colors. The father is Brown chinese and the mother is white chinese. This i was told, by a member who is very knowledgeable, is a sex link cross. The females will be white and the males will be pied or the very rare dilute. I was also told by another member that if the mating was switched(white gander x brown goose) then the females would be pied and the males would be white. i wont know for sure until next season when i try the switch and If the first part is true these are all Pied ganders.

    My youngest Pied Chinese at 3 wks. the breast is noticeably brighter yellow than a normal brown gosling.
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    My oldest at 6 wks and 10 wks the feathers are in and the breast is white
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    Next is my Brown Chinese X Tufted Roman cross gosling. The father is Brown chinese and the mother is Tufted Roman. This would also be sex linked and the turn out of gender/color is the same and its probably a gander too.

    At 1 day old. Brighter chest and bright yellow wings
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    At 6 wks and 10 wks old feathers are in. The breast and wings are white.
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    Both together, they both have chin spots too
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    This is what mine turned out to be and is not meant to suggest that this is what you have or will get. Some may have more white and some may have almost none. This is just to compare with since as i said at the beginning i could not find pics of pied goslings when mine hatched.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  2. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Huh interesting, I suppose you could do the same with africans to get a pied...Very Cool!
     
  3. White African on Brown African should give pied also. I plan on crossing my toulouse with a tufted next season to see if that will produce some also.
     
  4. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh fun! I cant stand when people cross geese cuz they usually just let their flock go but when its experimental and/or controlled its quite fun!
     
  5. I have 23 geese and goslings total. Only 2 are actual "crossbreeds" the rest are all purebred.
     
  6. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    See I like that alot, people who can maintain themselves! I only have one goose(African) but I dont think I would ever cross her with anything but another color of African. But I dont think i will ever breed her :/
     
  7. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    A lone goose? I bet she'd rather breed crossbred offspring than none. ;)

    Why do you think you'll never breed her? Is she injured or is she bonded to you as her mate? Or is she just a pet?

    I'm supportive of maintaining good breed lines too, but personally I prefer mongrels, so I don't bring in purebred anythings. Often its not the best idea when people buy in rare purebreds and cross them all over the place. They would produce some great new genetic mixes, but it's not good for the breeds involved... But then again neither is excessive inbreeding due to maintaining the purity of a receding genetic pool... So I don't have any condemnation of those who do or don't, each to their own. Pros and cons, there isn't an absolute wrong there.

    Throughout recent history people have tended to get up in arms about purebred crosses, but really they are necessary for the future health of that species, and many purebreds began as crosses. So it's always interesting to see if people make their experiments into a new breed. Best wishes with that.

    Nice Pied goslings by the way, sweet faces on them. I've had Toulouse X Embden and Chinese X Pilgrims in the past. I found geese too strongly family oriented and bonded to make easy meat livestock. Good as pets, lawn mowers, etc, but I'm not sure I'd use them as food again, their memories were too long, lol...
     
  8. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well She is a pet along with my lone mallard drake, My drake is imprinted on me and my goose on him. She has terrible genetics just from hatcheries not maintaining the birds composition and quality, but hey she lays a lot of eggs :/

    Also thats just it, I am all for crossbreeding as long as it is controlled not people letting their flock do what they want.
     
  9. I cant eat mine either. I refuse to lol i wont even eat a chicken i raised. I have a friend who takes my extra roosters.
     
  10. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: At least she's got a happy life, that's about as much as anyone can do. While it's a shame she can't have her own offspring through no fault of her own, it's good you're not breeding on with genes that could lead to suffering or degrade the whole breed. I'm not a fan of hatcheries in general, I know there's good ones, but too often they aren't even checking that the babies they hatch are correct in any way. I'v seen some shocking stock come from hatcheries.

    I have a few lovely and productive birds who I can't breed either due to inherited faults. It's a shame.

    Quote: I can eat my roosters though some are pets so they have the 'get out of the pot free' card.

    But with all livestock my criteria for them being edible involves a happy healthy life, a peaceful cull they were not aware of before it happened, and the culls can't be distressing to the rest of the flock. With the chooks this can be achieved but with the geese, they just got more and more suspicious and anxious as more and more ganders went missing, it was too stressful for them so that's invalidated them as meat birds for me. Too intelligent and too strongly family oriented. If it can't be done peacefully, it must not be done at all. Just my stance on it for my flock's and family's collective health. So we ended up rehoming the geese.

    Best wishes to both of you.
     

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