Pigeon squabs update 3

Discussion in 'Pigeons and Doves' started by 210175, Aug 11, 2013.

  1. 210175

    210175 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    hi everyone, My squabs are growing amazingly fast, they are about half the size of the male pigeon and they are just about starting to get feathers. One I can see has darker colored skin and one look to be fully white. I have given them a name. the black one is wiggle and the white one is jiggle. I named them that because they are always wiggling and jiggling. Yesterday I witnessed my female feeding the squabs, which I had never seen before. It was so amazing. they are even being leaved uncovered a bit and are only going on them for a feed and a little sit on. Amazing they are only 9 days old but they have grown so much.

    I'm worried the pigeons have been spending a lot of time on the floor and I think they are up to some mating. We are still going to redo the shed and we need to move everything but the pigeons can still be put in a cage and put together with the squabs.
    Is it ok if the pigeons had to have eggs now to take it away from them because I don't want them to incubate them and then I move them into and they wont sit on them. What should I do, if you want extra info just tell me. so I have no worries because by the time we move the squabs and the parents into the cage the squabs will be with be 13 days old and have some feathers. ANY COMMENTS WOULD BE GREAT.
     
  2. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    My guess is your parents will have a second clutch of eggs in about another 10 days.

    Set them up with another nest bowl. With a bit of luck you may be able to transfer the squabs and the second clutch into your new digs without incident.

    Wost case scenario you may loose the second clutch of eggs.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2013
  3. 210175

    210175 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't mind if I loose the eggs because they can have another in 10 days. But I researched in this time and the squabs should be fine because they will be in an enclosed space and they will be 2 weeks old the age that they get a lot of feathers. Do you think the squabs will be fine. I will put another nest box in the mean time. Overall do you think the squabs will be fine with there age. I must tell you they are very healthy and very cute. do you think they will be ok.
     
  4. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    The squabs will soon be able to fend for themselves.

    Your worst case would be you may have to hand feed them for a week or more.

    I honestly think they will be fine and the parents will not abandon them at this late stage of the game.
     
  5. 210175

    210175 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think the parents are very good parents, I don't mind if the mother does not feed them from that point but I know the father will. out of question when they are two weeks old are the able to walk properly and even try and get out of the nest. when they are in the confined space they kind of have to stay with there young. they cant get away from them. Also at the tip of my squabs beek it is white creamy but it is only the tip. in some pics of baby I have seen this before is it normal.
     
  6. 210175

    210175 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also hokum, you know how you had squabs that died around 10 days. so sorry but did they die because they were uncoverd or because they were not getting any food.

    thankyou
     
  7. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    They died because of exposure to the cold (February winter Canada). Things looked fine when I left the ♂ in the cleaned breeding compartments on the new nest bowl. Problems must have arisen when the♀ took over on the night shift.

    The refused to except the new nest bowl that I forced into their compartment. Since that episode both my best homers nest on the floor. He is the dominant ♂ in the loft and can nest wherever he chooses.

    They will not use nest bowls or breeding compartments since that episode. I am now fine with their decision. I clean their nest area when the young are mobile and can chase their parents for feedings (they usually have a second nest on the go by then)..
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2013
  8. 210175

    210175 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, I think they will be fine though locked up in the cage because it is warming up here and the parents are really starting to leave them alone and only go to them for feedings. In the cage they will be enclosed and should accept them. I am really not confident about hand feeding them since every time the squabs see me now they make a clicking noise and try to peck at me. Im am very sure that the male will due his job but if the female does not they should be fine because they don't really need heat. AND the father will feed them. I think the female will soon want to lay eggs again.

    when do the squabs become mobile a bit.


    When does the female stop hanging around with the squabs.
     
  9. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    Squabs become quite mobile at about 3 weeks of age.

    Every ♀ is not the same when it comes to raising their young. Pigeon breeds have different habits and personalities just the same as people.

    I have one ♂ homer who will feed any youngster that comes in his proximity.

    I have another ♂ homer who will scalp or pick the eye out of any strange squab that comes near him or that is left unattended.
     
  10. 210175

    210175 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    well I know my male is a very good father and a great homer pigeon.
     

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