Placement of coop in yard

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by GramaCindy, Nov 18, 2011.

  1. GramaCindy

    GramaCindy Out Of The Brooder

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    Hello everyone, WHAT A GREAT SIGHT:D I am in the process of winning over my hubby on the thought of raising a few chickens. I would like some meat birds and keep around 6 layers, over the winter here in NW WI. We have several predators here, wolves, bear, bobcat, coons, mink, weasel, badger, you name it, we've pretty much got it.[​IMG] It can get to -40* in the winter, So I know that I will have to insulate for sure. We have a wooded lot, with white pines, maples, etcÂ… There is an area that I have in mind near the sugar shack we just built that would be somewhat protected by the winter winds, and has a southern exposure. Not visible from the house however. Another area would be visible from the house, GOOD southern exposure, not much shade in the summer though. That location is only about 40' from the house. It doesn't look like I have enough posts to post a photo here yet, so sorry no pics.
     
  2. blefky

    blefky life in the yard

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    If it were me, I'd choose your second option - I like to have a line of sight to the coop. Needs to be a bit removed for me to be happy though - especially if you're planning on meat birds. Though they grow fast to point of processing, they can create quite a stink as they literally eat and poo - that's their cycle. RIR's and BR's are both hardy cold winter birds, but their are many others. Do a thorough search of the coops section of the forum for info. on cold winters and ventilation - very important for the health of the birds. Better to research and get it right the first time. Also, if large predators, especially bears, are a part of your equation I would definitely search in the forum about predator proofing. I believe a good electric boundary would be in order for you. Good luck![​IMG]
     
  3. krcote

    krcote Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I suggest the second option. The other thing you haven't considered is the snow. You will want your coop as close as possible when you have to shovel your way out there after every storm [​IMG]
     
  4. Chemguy

    Chemguy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I agree with this. Also, the closer the coop is to the house, the less distance you'll need to haul water and supplies. Your coop can be sucure no matter where it is located.
     
  5. Ole rooster

    Ole rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Plus you need a clean, clear avenue for a good shot for all the squirrels.[​IMG] I would always need to see my coop from the house. I can mine from the kitchen but I have to walk onto the front porch to get a clean shot. I've told all my neighbors I may be shooting down in here, they said shoot away.

    For predators I would say you have quite an array of choices. To many for me to worry with. I have about 5 and that's quite enough.
     
  6. GramaCindy

    GramaCindy Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2011
    Far NW Wisconsin
    Thanks for all of the replies folks. It looks like I may need to rethink both sights with meat birds espcecially! [​IMG]
     
  7. Hawkeye95

    Hawkeye95 Chillin' With My Peeps

    [​IMG]

    My neighbor raises meat birds in pretty close quarters (IMO, not a big enough pen or coop!) but he does it. He's got 24 birds in there and they are right up close to his house, and I don't ever smell them when I'm over there. I wouldn't worry about the smell so much, as the bigger worry- getting water and electric (if needed) out there and feeding and cleaning. I'd want to be able to see the coop easily so I could just look out a window if I heard anything unusual. As for shade-- I have ZERO shade in my yard. It's a problem for sure in the summer. But I planned ahead with lots of windows and ventilation and a partially covered run to offer more shade. I'm also going to plant trees and vines along the run this coming Spring to help with that problem. Anything can be worked out. [​IMG] So exciting about your new venture!! You'll be hooked for sure when you get your babies in! [​IMG]
     
  8. GramaCindy

    GramaCindy Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2011
    Far NW Wisconsin
    Thanks for the encouraging words Laurlee!
    Quote:
     
  9. GramaCindy

    GramaCindy Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2011
    Far NW Wisconsin
    That was like 4 years ago....I am FINALLY going to start raising chickens this spring! I plan on 6-8 layers. My coop will by 4x6 in the Wichita Cabin style.
    I have a few questions about coop placement in proximity to the house.

    Location #2 was my first choice, aprox 50' from front door, power access, somewhat protected from NW winds by shed/bunkhouse. Good views from house and easy access. My concern with this location is that our screen porch (which we use for about 5-6 months of the year) is about 40-50' away and I don't want to smell anything with a nice westerly breeze coming straight from the coop. Flies? are they an issue if I keep the coop and run clean? I am planning on using sand in the run and possibly the coop as well.[​IMG]Coop will be right behind the doe, to the left of the tree pictured here.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]screen porch apron. 40-50' away

    Location #1 is my second choice, a bit more shoveling in the winter. Also has power access. Not as easy or quick to get to in a hurry. More protected from the North and West by buildings. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]Coop Location #1 will be to the right of this building, under pine trees.

    I like location #2, but I just want to be sure that it won't be an issue so close to the house.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2015
  10. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    Love your site!!! I grew up spending all summer on a lake near Hayward, and really miss it. 24 sq. ft. is barely adequate for five or six hens; I'd build BIGGER for sure. Your birds will be in during the time a lot in winter and will need more space. Also consider a covered run for shade and to keep the snow out. Look forward to more pictures. I don't think odor will be a big issue at 50ft, unless things get reall nasty and drainage is a problem. Make sure the site stays dry; that's very important and so hard to fix later. My coop is insulated, which helps with both heat and cold winds. Access to water and shoveling those paths are considerations. I WILL bury a water line to my coop this spring! Consider cold hardy breeds, rather than birds with single combs. They will frostbite, which can't be pleasant. Mary
     
    1 person likes this.

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