Placement of coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Cherrypoint, Jun 14, 2016.

  1. Cherrypoint

    Cherrypoint New Egg

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    Mar 3, 2013
    A coop & good sized run will be built soon and am trying to figure the best place to put it. We have a 10 acre rectangle with woods on both sides of our property, only a few trees out in the center, pasture with two paddocks, barn and garden section. I am a beekeeper and know what direction the hives face, winter wind and west/south hot sun in summer. Chickens, not sure about. I have read books, looked at websites and nothing talks about placement.

    I don't want it too far back because of the coyotes and just being too far to keep an eye on or slog out in the winter/rain. Not too close to the woods, but not out in the open either. I have also been told don't place it too close to the house (noise/smell).

    I am sure ask 5 chicken people a question you get 20 answers, just like beekeepers. [​IMG] lol

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Martha in Missouri
    [​IMG]
     
  2. 21hens-incharge

    21hens-incharge Chicken Obsessed

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    Northern Colorado
    The best advice I can give .......

    Morning sun afternoon shade. Even if that shade comes from the structure itself.
    The run on the south will melt off faster in the winter and stay drier.
    Place it so the run and coop are on high ground to keep the run from being a soggy mess.


    That means a South East direction with the coop on the north west of the run for the run to get that morning sun and afternoon shade. If possible the human door on the west or south will aid in melting ice out of the way. A slight rise to place the coop and run on will be much better then a sunken spot on the land.

    That is not always a possibility for many people as in my yard I could not. My coop is on the south end with the run facing west. The human door is on the north that means I am battling ice all winter and risking a broken hip to get in there two or three times a day. I am in town and that was the only place I could put the structure.
    You are lucky that you have options.[​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Missouri
    Given a choice and all else being equal, front of the coop, the part with windows, etc. should always face south towards winter sun. You want the winter sun shining in as far and deep into the building as possible. Door into the house / coop placed on the east away from prevailing winter winds.

    Also, the site it sits on should also be on a well drained, elevated site, also sloping south to take advantage of the winter sun. A south facing slope is warmer and dryer in winter. So much so, it affects the vegetation that grows on it. Go to the woods and look at what trees are growing there. Shorter brushy stuff on the south facing slope, with dense underbrush....soils in winter will be warmer and dryer. On a north facing slope, trees like maples and oaks and the vegetation is sparse. Soils on north facing slope in winter are cool and damp to cold and wet. So given a choice, put your coop on a south facing slope. 2nd choice sloping east; 3rd choice sloping west and if a north facing slope is all you have, find somewhere else.

    In the open is good, but having a shade tree nearby is a big help. Birds need winter sun, but suffer in the direct beating sun of summer. On this dry, elevated, south facing slope, if it can be located near trees on the north to act as a windbreak for the winter winds, that is ideal.

    Close enough to the house you live in to be seen and observed and not a long walk to go see about/tend them, but not so close that any smell or odors (should not be much) will not be noticeable. Some don't mind birds and the droppings they leave behind on their deck and/or patio and patio furniture. Others do. If you object, fence them in a pen or run or fence them out from your house.
     
  4. Cherrypoint

    Cherrypoint New Egg

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    Mar 3, 2013
    Thank you!!!! I have been asking this of my friends who have chickens on their farms and not received any answers. Just vague stuff. Beehives also need to slope because of winter moisture and best not to have direct west summer sun.[​IMG]

    Now we know where to start building it![​IMG]

    Thank you!

    Martha in Missouri
     
  5. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 18, 2016
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    Since you are from Missouri, you miight find it amusing to know that the State of MO once maintained an experimental poultry research farm at Mountain Grove. That was about 100 years ago. Not sure how long it lasted, but you can still find some of their publications on the Web. Interesting stuff.
     

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