Planning flock for spring- which is best?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by kristim23, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. kristim23

    kristim23 Out Of The Brooder

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    My DH and I are in the planning stages of getting our first chickens in the spring. We are going to have an 8x8 coop, and were planning on getting 2 each of the following: Buff Orps, Black Aust., Barred Rocks, SLWyandottes (how is that pronounced, anyway), and EE. In the meantime, I have decided to get 2 Blue And. and 2 Wellsummer. BUT, I have read that from , hatcheries, Wells. eggs may not be as dark, and the blues aren't as "typey" Would I be better off to get the first batch, and then wait a year and get the blues and Wells as eggs from breeders? Can you just "make" a hen broody by putting eggs under her? In my head, this would work... however, I also am clueless!! Thanks in advance!!![​IMG]
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    I'd get the Wellsummers from a breeder to make sure you have the maximum color you can get to the eggs. It's pronounced Why-An-Dots accent on the first syllable. You cannot make a hen broody. It's a hormonal thing that has been bred out of most production laying breeds because it is not a good trait for production hens. Broody hens will not lay their own eggs once they go broody, so it is not desirable. Take heart though- I have all production breeds and have a chronic GLW broody and a new BO broody, so it does happen. Maybe you will be lucky enough to get one. You could also plan for getting a silkie or cochin which are well known for going broody.

    Hope that I answered all your questions. Good luck with your new hobby.
     
  3. kristim23

    kristim23 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the info! I will definetly follow your advice as far as buying from a breeder. I want those dark brown eggs! I also thought maybe it would be better top get chickens in two groups since I am new to this- but whats 4 more when I'd already have ten? I also don't have a good quaranteen spot for other hens, and even if I had a broody hen, it probably wouldn't be timed right for when I have eggs to hatch. Also, assuming that the timing DID work out, and I had one hen hatch eggs from breeder, does that mean the rest of the flock would accept them? Not sure. The more I think about it, maybe I should just get them all in one batch from hatchery, cross my fingers and hope. I think I'm going to order chicks from Meyer Hatchery. Its closer, and they will ship smaller orders. UNLESS I find negative feedack on them. Thanks again!
     
  4. kristim23

    kristim23 Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG] Why did I spell quarantine wrong?? Chicken brain, perhaps?[​IMG]
     
  5. greyhorsewoman

    greyhorsewoman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You might want to start with the flock you are interested in ... integrating chickens into existing flocks can be troublesome. Meyer's is a decent hatchery ... been around a long time ... you will always fine good and bad reviews on hatcheries. The reason most folks opt for incubators are because depending on getting a broody chicken isn't a good plan. Good luck.
     
  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Are you going to have a run or free range, in addition to your coop? 14 birds puts you right at 4feet/bird, in my mind that's getting pretty tight. I know people DO keep them that crowded, but I also know most of your undesirable behaviors come from overcrowding, and it's so much easier to prevent these behaviors that fix them once they are established. Also, as anyone here can tell you, chickens have a way of multiplying almost on their own [​IMG] So, if you can do a larger coop, or put a nice big run on it, do it now, before you have birds!
     
  7. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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  8. kristim23

    kristim23 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks so much , everyone! I was thinking that maybe I was planning on too many. We will have a run, it will be 8x???. I WISH I could free range, but I don't think I can. Neighbors too close, my own dogs, lots of stray dogs/cats, bears, coyotes, not to mention nearby creek with muskrat, etc. That also means no rooster, bummer:( I was originally going to get 8-10 hens, but after reading here and discovering chicken math, (love that term) I figured we should plan for 16. I thought 8x8 would be good, but I guess not? We do know that we will cover the run with clear plastic for the winter, I have also read that the cold won't stop them from going out, just snow and wind, so thats why. Is this incorrect? This is why I have started planning so far in advance... I'm trying to give myself the least amount of problems possible. The reason for the additional hens is because I decided that I would like to have a variety of egg colors... Maybe I should swap some brown layers for white, blue, dark brown...

    OR instead of getting two of each, get one of each. That brings me down to seven.

    One thing I know for sure is that an auto hen door and a droppings board seem like a necessity to me!!


    I can't tell you how much I appreciate all the help!!!
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2010

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