1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Planting where there used to be a run.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Brian Pickleman, May 6, 2016.

  1. Brian Pickleman

    Brian Pickleman New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    May 4, 2016
    I recently moved my chicken coop and run. It had been in the previous location for a little over a year. Is there any way to speed up the breakdown of ammonia in the soil to enable me to plant a few heavy feeding plants there this season? Anything I can do to neutralize the smell?
    Thanks
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

    21,681
    2,617
    466
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    IMO, the biggest problems with growing where there were chickens is the soil compaction and excess phosphorus. That inhibits uptake of zinc and iron, causing a deficiency of those minerals.
    I don't think ammonia is a problem in the soil.
    As far as smell and the organic matter, there's a product called Farm360 from Gro2Max that will do the job.
     
  3. Rock Home Isle

    Rock Home Isle Chillin' With My Peeps

    The ground that you are talking about is experiencing a nutrient over load. You'll need to increase the carbon content of the ground so that composting can take place and the nutrients made available. The composting will go a LONG WAY towards reducing the smells that you mentioned.

    You'll need to incorporate high carbon organic materials into the soil and then let the ground go fallow for a season. Cover the ground with large portions of Wood Shavings, Leaf Litter, Straw or Lawn Clippings, then rototill the material into the ground. Another source would be to run a bunch of tree pruning material through a wood chipper...its bulky, but with a high nutrient load it should break down well. It will probably take a lot of material to offset the nutrient load, a soil test would give you a better idea of how much material you'll need to incorporate. Ask for a recommendation with the soil test...

    Once everything is rototilled into the ground then water the area and let it sit for the summer. Next spring you should have a nice rich soil...great, awesome garden soil...and NO smell.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Brian Pickleman

    Brian Pickleman New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    May 4, 2016
    Thanks!
     
  5. Brian Pickleman

    Brian Pickleman New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    May 4, 2016
    Thank you!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by