Plastic Shed suitable for new Hen House??

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by untamed_spirit, May 28, 2015.

  1. untamed_spirit

    untamed_spirit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi guys,

    My hens currently live in a wooden play-house. It has lasted a good 3 years (plus the time it was actually used as a kids playhouse) but is falling to pieces now. I am looking into getting a 6x6ft plastic shed and converting it appropriately into a chicken house, but I have a couple of questions first:

    1) Are plastic sheds even suitable for use as a chicken house?

    2) Would i need to add extra ventilation holes or would the ventilation grid at the top be sufficient?

    3) Has anyone ever cut into the side panel of these plastic sheds to create a pop-hole, does it affect the integrity of the panel?

    4) I plan on fixing brackets to the walls to lay perching poles in, would the plastic hold the weight sufficiently?

    5) Would it be best to cut holes in the sides and attached nesting boxes or to just have nesting boxes inside the shed?

    5) Would the temperature inside get too hot in the summer or too cold in winter (I live in UK, so we have temperature fluctuations but not extremes normally.)

    6) Is there anything else I should consider in my design?

    This is a link to the shed I intend to use: http://www.homebase.co.uk/en/homebaseuk/garden/sheds/keter-plastic-factor-apex-shed-6-x-6ft-218927

    I would be interested in peoples opinions in all the matters above, and also if anybody has successfully converted a plastic shed into a chicken coop, pictures would be great!


    Thanks!

    Ellie
     
  2. papajoe

    papajoe Out Of The Brooder

    I think you could use the plastic, but you would need to be creative in making it into a good coop. Looks like it needs more ventilation, problem with plastics is it will split when you try to cut or drill it. from the price of the shed I think you could have one built of wood, not trying to be a downer but to me wood is the way, good luck with your choices.
     
  3. rides2far

    rides2far Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would have lots of ventilation in it. My brooders were plastic totes & they got so hot, I couldn't use heat lamps in them. I would definitely have your coop in a well shaded area. On the + side, the coop would probably be very sturdy! Good luck with your project.
     
  4. untamed_spirit

    untamed_spirit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's the temperarure that bothers me the most, I don't want to come down one summers day to a lot of bbq chickens! I prefer wood but my husband is obsessed with mites, and likes the idea of being able to power wash a plastic shed plus tge lack of grooves and hiding holes in plastic compared to wood. I may try and compromise by getting a wooden shed and putting mdf panels over the insides fitting them snugly and sealing them to try and reduce crevices for mites!

    Thanks guys, now I have anmo for wood vs plastic!
     
  5. rides2far

    rides2far Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I can understand your husband wanting the ease & ability to really clean plastic. Our coop is wood, but we painted the inside of the coop. Paint helps prevent the mites from getting into the grain, plus that bright white paint makes it easy to spot little critters on the wood!
     
  6. untamed_spirit

    untamed_spirit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thats a good idea, would look nice too! There is so many ideas out there, its deciding which ones to do thats the issue now!!

    Ellie
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Power washing is never really a good idea, IMO......coops need to be dry.

    Putting interior sheathing on a stud built wall is making a place for many critters(rodent types) to house themselves,
    leaving the studs bare inside and painting with a good product is the best idea if you're a 'cleaner'.

    I am not a 'cleaner', but then I've never had a mite infestation....have you had mites in the past?

    Wooden structures would be much easier to modify than plastic ones...both initially and down the road.
     
  8. untamed_spirit

    untamed_spirit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My husband is a 'cleaner'! We have only had a mite infestation once in 4 years of keeping chickens, and only the occasional mite in between, but my husband really really hates them! I am thinking the paint idea would take up less space in the shed too than panels. I have decided we are going with an 8ftx6ft wooden shed as that is the maximum we can fit in our run (width ways anyway) and saves us having to upgrade again for a while! I will paint the inside with a good quality paint to make the surfaces more slippery for the mites, and once its completely dried and aired I will add in the perches and nest boxes.

    Are there any types of paint that are non-toxic or safer for chickens than others??
     
  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Most paints are non toxic when completely cured, I'd get a paint that will stand up to the 'cleaning'......
    ......but still beware that water can cause more problems than it cures.

    Might kill the mites(haha).....but create a mold/mildew issue....many organisms that cause illness need moisture to thrive.
    And chicken coops are dustydustydusty, adding wet cleaning to dust just makes mud...I use a vacuum (a hoover?) to clean up dust if needed.
     
  10. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Have you looked into sheet metal sheds? Those rubbermaid sheds are awfully expensive - and much smaller than I'd normally put chickens in.
     

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