Please Help! Aggressive Roo??

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by OneCrazyCowgirl, Mar 16, 2013.

  1. OneCrazyCowgirl

    OneCrazyCowgirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ok. I've seen this happen a few times but this threw me over the edge.
    Ok. Before I tell yall,
    I ordered 16 and 1 rooster. As time went on I noticed that Alabama was a rooster. Alabama is the perfect rooster, he is gourgous and his crow sounds like an angel. But one day, I heard one of my hens scream. I saw Alabama grabbing Carolina's comb and it appeared he was trying to yank it off. I ran in and seperated the two. I thought maybe they got into a squabble and ignored it. Couple of days later saw that he was yanking Shawnee's comb. As soon as I ran to the rescue, he let go. I wondered about it but soon shrugged it off. Couple days later, he did it again, this time to Sunny. I was beginning to worry, and kept an eye on him. As I let the girls, Rocky the Wellie Roo and Alabama in, I heard a scream. I ran to see what was going on and Alabama was biting onto Sandy, my silkie's head feathers and yanking extremely hard. The scream was Sandy was one of the worst sounds ever. I screamed and grabbed Alabama off and ran into the house to write this. My chickens are a little over 4 months old. I have two roos, Alabama and Rocky and all the rest hens. Does anyone know what this behavior is, and if I can stop it? Please help. Gonna go check on sandy.....hopefully I'll have some replies when I get back....
     
  2. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Idaho/Utah
    A roo will often grab the back of a hen's neck or head when trying to breed. Do you think his hormones may be kicking in & he's trying to figure out logistics of how to breed?
     
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  3. OneCrazyCowgirl

    OneCrazyCowgirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yes, that is something I am considering. The hens have been laying little itty bitty eggs and the roosters are crowing so I think that may be the case. The only thing I was wondering was why the other rooster hasn't done it.yet. The other roo crowed almost a month earlier so I'd think he'd be the first to do it.
     
  4. BunkyB

    BunkyB Chillin' With My Peeps

    I feel the same. Especially young roosters who haven't quite got it right yet for copulation. Practice, practice...lol He will get the hang of it soon enough. It definitely sounds like a mating session gone awry. She must be his favorite if he continues. Try not to worry so much. He will get it right soon.
     
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  5. BunkyB

    BunkyB Chillin' With My Peeps

    I forgot to mention this in the last post. If your hen starts bleeding from the comb or neck due to the roosters aggressiveness ,seperate her for a few days. When other hens see blood they go right for the source of the blood and there could be issues there. Cannibalism is part of chickens when they see blood. If this happens I use spray bandaid stuff to cover the wound and let it heal...
     
  6. OneCrazyCowgirl

    OneCrazyCowgirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Alrighty. Thanks. I'll keep an eye on him. :)
     
  7. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 25, 2008
    Idaho/Utah
    Caution: Some skin protection products are VERY painful on open wounds. If I'm remembering right, Nu-Skin is one of them, so I don't recommend using that one if you decide to use one.
    Also, if you separate a hen, keep her in view of the other birds, or let her mingle with them for a short time each day, so she does not seem like a stranger when she returns to living with the flock. After only 3-5 days' absence, chickens consider an old acquaintance sort of a new stranger, & their social standing has to be re-established through squabbles.
     

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