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Please help, baby goat not doing so good

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Lillyk24, Mar 20, 2016.

  1. Lillyk24

    Lillyk24 Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi I bought 2 goats from someone on Craigslist and boy did I get scammed. I wouldn't trade these little guys for anything, I have only had them a week, but love them like my own kids. I believe she was a "puppy mill" she had tons of animals running around in a dirty environment. I was happy to save these two, but I am having major issues with one of them, please help.

    OK, first I think they were both taken away from the momma too early, not my choice! Please don't judge. The little guy (Bambino) is about 10 days old. I think he didnt get the colostrum from his mom. He is having issues, I took him to the vet the next day after "rescuing them". Bambino does not walk well, he limps and if you touch is back by is back legs he kind of falls down or seems like he hurts, he cracked and fell and couldnt get up by himself, he also shakes a lot then his poop was really runny like bad diarrhea, the vet gave him shots and medicine for me to give him sulfur for 10 days to help with that. It has, but its still yellow and wet. Is this normal for a baby? My other one (Pumpkin), she claimed he is 9 weeks old, no way, he is a little bigger than Bambino I think he is about 2 weeks old or so was on whole milk, but the vet said that was really bad so they are both on milk re-placer.

    I guess my question(s) are:

    Why does his back hurt? He does not crack anymore when helping him up and he gets up on his own now, but he still limps and jumps a bit when walking. Any ideas why? The vet said if he doesn't get better with in 3 days there is no hope, well its been 6 days and I see a lot of improvement so my hopes are high. I just worry for him

    How much should they be eating-how often? I researched it and everywhere says something different. I am on a schedule where we feed them both by bottle every 3-4 hours. They have no interest in hay or grains or plain water. They currently live in our house in our mudroom and I have a space heater in there (its a little cold) but he still shakes a lot, Bambino, the other one Pumpkin is as happy as can be, he jumps and runs around and head butts the little one knocking him over at times.

    I am really sorry for the long message, but I am a animal lover and I dont want anything to happen to my new babies. Any suggestions/recommendations are greatly appreciated. Please no haters or mean comments. I am doing the best I can.

    Thanks

    Jen
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Runs With Chickens Premium Member

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    It is quite normal for goat kids to be pulled off the mom after three days and raised by bottle. What brand of milk replacer are you feeding, hopefully it's for goats, it should come with instructions on how to mix and recommend amounts to feed. If they are truly around 2 weeks old they should be drinking 8-10 ounces 3 times a day, are they large or miniature breeds? Softer light colored poop is normal for bottle kids, they won't make berries until their ramen develops and they are eating hay. I will also follow up my bottles with a bit of water which I increase as they get older.

    It sounds like the one was either injured or has a birth defect, it's possible his mom stepped on him. If he's improving that's good, handle him gently. All goat kids will jump while walking so maybe he's not so bad. I would continue to feed him well and see what happens, as you've seen most vets know nothing of goats. The brand of milk replacer I use is made from powdered goat milk and contains colostrum, so pick a good brand and make all dietary changes or increases slowly, changing feed too quickly will kill goats.
     
  3. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    A few things I would put on my list of things that may be going on with your little guy include swayback (enzootic ataxia or copper deficiency), floppy kid disease (treated with baking soda), and selenium deficiency. Things that could be causing the diarrhea involve a whole host of processes, but it's hard to list them without seeing it for myself. Things like infections and parasites may cause scours symptoms. However, it could also be a totally normal thing as well.

    If he is continuing to get better, I would give him time to see what happens and maybe consult further with your vet. Remember, it never hurts to get a second opinion if you find yourself questioning a diagnosis or treatment. You know what is best for your animals!

    Milk replacers can cause some trouble if they are not balanced or mixed correctly. I tend to prefer whole milk (pasteurized) over replacers, but many people have no issues with replacers. I think it's really a choice people should make based on the health of the goats and research. Inadequate colostrum at birth can definitely cause issues but unfortunately at this point there is no use giving colostrum.

    I will keep my fingers crossed for you but keep us updated!
     
  4. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Navel ill could be a possibility too. I can't make a big post right now, but that came to mind with the hind end weakness.
     
  5. cassie

    cassie Overrun With Chickens

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    Naval ill is a definite possibility. Feel the joints, particularly the hock joint in the affected leg. If it is naval ill, the joint is usually swollen and it may be tender. The animal gets naval ill through the navel cord shortly after birth although symptoms do not appear immediately. It is a generalized infection and the treatment is a course of antibiotics. Usually animals with naval ill have a fever.
     
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