Please help! Chickens with eye problems ...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Bjcm, Jun 25, 2019.

  1. Bjcm

    Bjcm In the Brooder

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    Yes she has chickens as well. There is no nasal discharge. I don't believe there is a smell.
     
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  2. coach723

    coach723 Crowing

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    It does look like a respiratory infection to me also, the bubbly eyes and swelling. I would do the treatment as suggested and do some reading so you understand what you are dealing with. If you have a vet that will see a chicken they still may be able to narrow it down for you. Some respiratory diseases are chronic, the symptoms can be treated, but they can recur, and birds are often carriers for life.
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Swollen eyes would not be from coccidiosis. I would also treat for possible coccidiosis with Corid for 5-7 days.

    Tylan will only treat MG, and may be used with sulfa antibiotics with coryza. A virus such as infectious bronchitis or ILT will not respond to antibiotics. But sometimes they may be one or more diseases, and then Tylan might be helpful.

    The foam in the eyes and the swollen eye point to possible MG. It is a chronic disease, meaning the chicken and the rest of the flock will be carriers for life, whether they have symptoms or not. It can show up whenever there is stress, especially during a molt or extreme cold weather. Any type of poultry can carry MG, but it only remains alive for 3-4 dayson chickens, clothing, shoes, or equipment. Once the present birds are all gone, the owner can start over with a healthy flock. Here is some info about MG:
    https://thepoultrysite.com/disease-...tion-m-g-chronic-respiratory-disease-chickens

    http://www.gapoultrylab.org/wp-cont...coplasma handout for Backyard Flocks 4-12.pdf
     
  4. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    Photos of the poop?
    I see bubbles in the eye, likely it's respiratory disease.
    You mention red in the poop(?) the Corid won't hurt, but it will not treat respiratory disease. If you have vet care that is always best.
    If symptoms don't clear up or worsen in a couple of days with flushing the eyes with saline then you can try treating with an antibiotic like Tylan50. Dosage is 0.25ml per pound of weight given orally 3 times a day for 5 days. Keep in mind that respiratory disease is not cured with antibiotics and birds remain carriers even when recovered.
    upload_2019-6-25_13-18-17.png
     
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  5. Henriettamom919

    Henriettamom919 Crowing

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    @Wyorp Rock For my own information, with MG is it then recommended to get rid of chicks that have this? If I'm understanding correctly any future chickens will develop this also it the carriers are still present?

    I'm in no way saying this person should get rid of their chicks but you wouldn't be able to add to the flock without accepting exposure, right?
     
  6. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    There's no straightforward answer on this. Everyone does things differently.
    If it's MG, then yes, you would consider all birds that are housed/live with the sick chick as exposed and as carriers, even if those never show symptoms. I would consider every bird on the property carriers even if they are in separate housing - MG is spread bird to bird, in dust/dander, on clothes/shoes, through hatching eggs - you know that wind will carry dust dander and shoes would track it, no one is going to change clothes either, let's just be realistic here.
    Some choose to "manage" symptoms monthly by administering Denagard to the flock's water for 3 days each month.
    As for culling all...that's a bit tougher. Yes, you can cull all, disinfect, wait for a few weeks and start over. Some people keep a closed flock (no selling/showing) or they may cull only those that are symptomatic and breed from there.
    You are right, if you added to the flock, there is the potential for new birds to become sick.
    Again, it's not cut and dry. Birds may never show symptoms at all, this is why testing to find out the cause is always a good idea. An eye infection can be caused by a lot of things. Most likely it's respiratory disease, but getting debris in the eye, a scratch, ammonia, molds, etc. can also be a source of infection as well.


    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm011
     
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  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    MG is very common in backyard flocks and wild birds can bring it in. The easiest thing to do is to close your flock to birds coming in or leaving your flock. Treat or cull sick birds. Learn all you can about the disease, and get a bird necropsied and tested if you lose one.
     
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