Jun 12, 2020
8
5
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Hello everyone!
I am extremely new to this so I need all the help I can get. My boyfriend and I recently moved to a farm owned by my boyfriends parents. They have a coop with chickens and ducks. We have been slowly learning how to take care of them (a man who took care of the land was in charge before).

Last night I walked to the coop only to find that our drake was attacking a hen. I managed to move him away and took her to our house.
There was blood all over her head. All the feathers under her right wing were missing. Her right finger was broken. And she was not moving her left leg at all. She was not moving at all generally, but she was still breathing.
I cleaned her wounds. Added an antibiotic spray to the cleaned wounds that we had used for our injured dog. Gave her some water through a syringe. Her eyes were also closed and she was breathing through her mouth.

24 hours later:
She is still alive and warm. She pooped once. I am feeding her through a syringe and keeping her hydrated. She isn’t moving her left leg at all. Her right leg is fine, she is using it to try and stand up. She keeps breathing from her mouth. Above all her neck concerns me. She isn’t straightening it, she can’t look straight forward. She opened her eyes a little and she can see still see in both thank God.

I attached some pictures, any advice would be so appreciated.
The 5th picture is of her neck and how it’s bent.
The 6th picture is of the feathers plucked under her wing.

Thank you!
3BDFF73E-E441-4EF4-8AC2-2BAEA28D6B7D.jpeg 6DBED74A-A2CD-4589-BB26-02A691014103.jpeg 15423D20-B6C9-4E24-96F4-A3D698E79951.jpeg 4CCB4D44-8506-4B43-937F-924C71203322.jpeg 7CF85299-2FCD-4368-A550-DDABC36E6C38.jpeg 0E625C0C-DF13-4AD1-BE5F-1AB737EDE2EE.jpeg 7E1B0B96-2AB1-41B8-941C-D435275349E3.jpeg
 

TheOddOneOut

🙄🤚 Doing my best.
Feb 15, 2020
10,951
42,024
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Oregon
Oh my! Why was he attacking her? Will you cull him for behavior like that? I would, personally. I don’t have much experience with treating injured animals, but make sure to keep her warm, and feel for other broken bones. He could have broken her spine, and she may be paralyzed.
 

LaFleche

Crossing the Road
8 Years
Sep 22, 2012
5,920
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852
Germany
When flooded by hormones drakes often go crazy and even abuse their own mate(e) until they are left with their heads all bloody and hardly able to stand or walk.

Our neighbours used to have quite a lot of ducks and every spring and early summer it was the same: their female ducks tried to escape the brutal abuse and to save themselves came over the fences and stayed with us for some time.

I would recommend to separate the waterfowl from the chickens.

Edit: There might even be too many drakes for the ducks and therefore strong competition which leads to aggressive overmating each and every bird that might come their way.
A good ratio would be 6-7 ducks for one drake.
 
Last edited:

TheOddOneOut

🙄🤚 Doing my best.
Feb 15, 2020
10,951
42,024
886
Oregon
When flooded by hormones drakes often go crazy and even abuse their own mate(e) until they are left with their heads all bloody and hardly able to stand or walk.

Our neighbours used to have quite a lot of ducks and every spring and early summer it was the same: their female ducks tried to escape the brutal abuse and to save themselves came over the fences and stayed with us for some time.

I would recommend to separate the waterfowl from the chickens.

Edit: There might even be too many drakes for the ducks and therefore strong competition which leads to aggressive overmating each and every bird that might come their way.
A good ratio would be 6-7 ducks for one drake.
But this hen was a chicken, lol.
 
Jun 12, 2020
8
5
8
Oh my! Why was he attacking her? Will you cull him for behavior like that? I would, personally. I don’t have much experience with treating injured animals, but make sure to keep her warm, and feel for other broken bones. He could have broken her spine, and she may be paralyzed.
Well he seems to have wanted to mate with her and she would not let him. She’s our strongest hen! We now have the ducks and chickens separated and we will be giving the drake away to a farmer close by who is very well experienced with ducks. We noticed he was also terrorizing all the other ducks. We are keeping her warm and trying our best to make her feel comfortable. We are afraid she is paralyzed in which case the most merciful thing to do would be to let her go...
 
Jun 12, 2020
8
5
8
When flooded by hormones drakes often go crazy and even abuse their own mate(e) until they are left with their heads all bloody and hardly able to stand or walk.

Our neighbours used to have quite a lot of ducks and every spring and early summer it was the same: their female ducks tried to escape the brutal abuse and to save themselves came over the fences and stayed with us for some time.

I would recommend to separate the waterfowl from the chickens.

Edit: There might even be too many drakes for the ducks and therefore strong competition which leads to aggressive overmating each and every bird that might come their way.
A good ratio would be 6-7 ducks for one drake.

Oh wow, we had no idea...
I am happy the drake is going to be relocated because we also don’t want this to happen to any of our ducks. We separated them now and everyone seems to be a bit more relaxed to be away from the drake. If we ever think of getting a new drake we will make sure we have enough ducks! Thank you :)
 

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