Please help! My duckling hasn't externally pipped in 12 hours.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by JocelynSeagreen, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. JocelynSeagreen

    JocelynSeagreen Out Of The Brooder

    I have 3 Muscovy duck eggs in the incubator. One of the ducklings has already hatched, the other one is zipping and my last one hasn't externally pipped in 12 hours after he internally pipped. He's still moving and the egg is rolling around occasionally. I want to know when I should start worrying and taking action to help the duckling? Will he suffocate if I don't make an external pip for him?
     
  2. nchls school

    nchls school Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Keep the incubator closed. It is important that the humidity not drop/change. A chick/duckling that can not pip on its own has very little chance at survival. Trying to intercede will, most likely, end in disappointment.
     
  3. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    It can take as long as 24 hours between internal and external and 24 hours between pip and zip. Some even go longer. The thing with chicks is you never know. There is no "point of worry" per se. I don't assist before an external pip and then only if there's been no progress after 18 hours after an external pip. At that point I may widen the pip to check on the condition of the chick, but then I usually deem everything fine and replace them until the 24 hour mark. Assisting is always a catch 22. You can help and they not make it and in many cases "help" is given too soon causeing death to a viable chick. Then you are left with "maybe I shouldn't have helped". You can not help and the chick dies in the shell and then you are left with "I should have helped." If you research you will find that they say the build up of co2 is what prompts the chick to make the external pip. If you put a hole in the air cell, in theory that is releasing the co2 and not prompting the chick to externally pip which in turn can take it longer to progress. I have seen some that do put a hole in the air cell, but it's not something I generally recommend.

    I also have a couple BYC friends who have done ducks and understand that they can take even longer to hatch once they start.

    I'm not a believer that one shouldn't assist. I do NOT believe that if it can not hatch on it's own, it's not good enough or strong enough and should be allowed to die, but my guidline is they do have to externally pip themselves, simply because going in too soon can cause more damage than good and can cause the loss of a chick that if given more time might have made it out on it's own.
     
  4. rocki769

    rocki769 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I NEED HELP
    I have a duckling that started hatching 5 days early and I'm stressing out. He's still in the egg but he's got the shell off the top where the air sack would be. He's also broken though part of the membrane. He hasn't absorbed all of the yolk and there is blood coming out of the egg. I have him wrapped in a warm paper towel under a heat lamp and I keep the remaining part of the membrane moist like most people say. But he's fighting the egg and wants out. I don't know what to do and I don't wanna lose him because he's the only one I have left. His breathing is really slow but he keeps kicking around. He chirps every once and awhile but mostly he's just trying to get out He's having trouble and the membrane is tearing, causing blood to spill out of the egg. Should i help him out? I don't know what to do
     
  5. JocelynSeagreen

    JocelynSeagreen Out Of The Brooder

    Thanks so much for the help. I left him in the incubator and waited it out. He's hatched now and is sleeping with the other ducklings :) He was a rather late duckling and I was worried about him but I learnt my lesson with another duckling that I almost lost from interfering with the hatching process.
     
  6. JocelynSeagreen

    JocelynSeagreen Out Of The Brooder


    I'm really sorry to hear about your duckling hatching so early. I'm sure I'm too late to help you but to be honest I wouldn't have known what to do for you ♡ how is the duckling now? Did he make it? And do you still need help?
     
  7. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    That's great! Congrats!
     
  8. nchls school

    nchls school Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Terrific news. I have assisted many chicks/ducklings/etc. in hatching with incubators or brooding hens. Most did not survive. Now, the only time I intercede is if the egg gets damaged in hatching by the broody hen. Most of those babies do survive.
     
  9. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I've had just the opposite experience. I have only lost one assisted hatcher and he didn't pass for over a week and I am pretty sure he had digestive issues. I can only assume his reasoning for not being able to hatch on it's own was greater than could be seen and he had more going on internally. He seemed quite active and "normal" except his poo was basically diarrehea. And he just could not gain weight or grow. I think a lot of depends on the why they need help as to the probability of wether they will survive post hatch. It's always best if they can hatch out on their own, but I help if I feel it's needed, especially with malepositioned chicks.
     

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