Please help - peachick suddenly very ill (photo)

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by AraucanaAnne, Jul 31, 2014.

  1. AraucanaAnne

    AraucanaAnne In the Brooder

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    Feb 24, 2013
    All my peachicks were healthy and active yesterday, but this morning one was lying in a corner. It's vent and abdomen are distended, feces are watery with a little blood, and it clearly does not feel well (doesn't want to move, not interested in food or water). I feed them medicated chick food, dandelion greens, the occasional treat (bread crust or scrambled egg), and water with vitamin/electrolyte suppliment. The other birds are all still active and healthy. They are about 7 weeks old.

    I am under the assumption that, like chickens, sometimes these things happen and there's usually not much you can do about it, but if there's anything peafowl-specific I'm not aware of, or if there's the possibility this might be curable, PLEASE let me know! I've already lost two peachicks (to totally different things) and don't want to lose another one. :-(


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  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    If it were mine and had been on the ground with chickens and I couln't take it to a vet, I would start by weighing it, then I would treat with Corid for coccidiosis, metronidazole for blackhead and Safeguard for capillary and cecal worms. I would do all three for five days in a row. I would also bring it inside, keep it in a room that's 80-85 degrees and tube feed it. Your best bet is to take it to a vet.

    If it had not been on the ground with chickens and had been in brooder I would treat with just Corid.

    These diseases that peachicks get *are* treatable when caught soon enough. How old is it and how much does it weigh?

    -Kathy
     
  3. My first thought since you said blood in stool is Coccidiosis and to start the Corid in the water. Take a stool sample to the vet to see what kind of worms it has and start that treatment too.
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Blackhead will also produce bloody stools. Have some pictures of those somewhere.

    -Kathy
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Time is critical, one day can mean life or death with any of the problems I mentioned, which is one of the reasons I treat for all at the same time. It's also important to know that a bird with blackhead might also have coccidiosis and/or E. Coli.

    At a very minimum, the chick should be started on something that will treat coccidiosis, like Corid, Sulmet, Albon, Dimethox, Baycox or SMZ/TMP.

    -Kathy
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    I can't tell on the iPad, but to me it looks like it's belly is slightly purple? Can anyone see that, or is it my imagination?

    -Kathy
     
  7. Yes, very inflamed red and purple. and quite swollen.
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General


    I've seen this before in chicken chicks and I don't think blackhead would cause that, though I can't say for sure, but I think coccidiosis or enteritis could. Time to see a vet.

    -Kathy
     
  9. AraucanaAnne

    AraucanaAnne In the Brooder

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    Feb 24, 2013
    Thanks so much for all your responses and suggestions. Sounds like coccidiosis is a major suspect - one question though, they are on feed that is already medicated for coccidiosis prevention - is it still possible for them to get it?

    I have had coccidiosis in chicken chicks before (who were on unmedicated feed), it was extremely contagious and the entire group of chicks all came down with it within the same day. Right now, all my other peachicks still appear perfectly healthy.
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    The chicken chicks at the feed store are fed medicated feed and they lose about half to coccidiosis every year. It helps prevent it, but it's no guarantee and it sure as heck won't treat it.

    Treatment for a severe case, which is what I always treat for with Corid is:
    2 teaspoons Corid liquid per gallon
    Or
    No less than 1.5 teaspoons Corid powder per gallon.

    Treatment is 5-7 days, make fresh daily and medicated water needs to be their only source of water.

    -Kathy
     
    1 person likes this.

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