***PLEASE*** HELP!!! Very sick Jersey Giant Rooster!!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by thompsonfarm, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. thompsonfarm

    thompsonfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We rescued our JG roo "Batman" from our neighbor's where he was getting abused by another jg roo about 9 months ago. We absolutely adore him, he is our lap chicken!!! At about a year old when we got him, Batman had no feathers, he was really scrawny, and awkward. He took to our flock right away, being the only roo, and we have enjoyed him so much!!! We love him dearly.
    So now that you know alittle bit about him, heres whats going on:
    Just over a week ago he started stubling around, we thought it was due to his feet being cold because he refuses to sleep on the roost (he sleeps on the ground with some other chickens under his wings its really cute actually.) But he just keeps getting worse. here are his symptoms:
    -total paralysis up to the neck
    -weazing
    -thick saliva (has subsided since we have been treating him)
    -feather loss on his neck
    -total disorientation
    -inability to hold head up for long periods of time thus difficulty swallowing
    -mushy crop
    -swolen feet and legs
    -green stool
    -drooping comb
    -lack of color in waddles (comes and goes)

    At first i though Botulism so i have treated him with an Epsom salt flush, i have been giving him Molassis and vitamins along with probiotics in his water. Yesterday I put a tube into his crop and forced some charcoal into it to absorb any toxins that has seemed to help tremendously. I just want to know if anyone had any ideas about what this might be or anything else i can do for the poor guy. I love him very much and i dont want to loose him.


    BTW i did find a tiny bug in him so i immediately dusted him with DE and it didnt look much like a mite but possibly a louse....

    Thank you in advance!!!!
     
  2. thompsonfarm

    thompsonfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Please anybody?
     
  3. farmtotable

    farmtotable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is he still suffering from the paralysis? Given the symptoms you described, my first thought was also toxins, so good call on the charcoal. Does he free range? Have you checked his roaming area for anything that might be poisonous? (Mushrooms, etc....) I'm afraid I really don't have much advice to give you, but I hate it when I've posted stuff for emergencies and no one answers.

    He sounds like the world's sweetest rooster, so I sure hope he makes it. Have you isolated him in a warm area with clean water and food?

    Also, regarding the roosting thing (and yes, that sounds really cute!) I have two Jersey Giants and they never roost. Maybe that breed prefers sleeping on the ground (or maybe they're so dang big flapping on up there is too much work).
     
  4. livercelluar123

    livercelluar123 Out Of The Brooder

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    I had The same problem but she ended up dyeing just after he recoverd first you probably should get some kind of syringe and get some probiotic yogurt and squirt that into his throat and massage his crop and get a calm hen to keep him company and bring him into your basement or some other place warm an dry get some kind of adjustable string and tie it to a shelf or some other thing and take some ribbon and figure eight it around his legs and tie it at the top and loosely around his neck and pull the string up she he's touching the ground but it takes weight off of his feet food wise get starter fees and some chicken scratch and cracked corn and boil water then pour the water until the food soaks it up and drain excess water it has to be the consistency of mash so if you pick it up its bit liquids but you could press it an make like a mini patty. feed it to them while its warm and try to get him to drink DO NOT SYRINGE FEED HIM WATER. Hold him when your home and put your hen back with the rest if the flock and at night bring her back In. That odd contraption I mentioned before worked for me and she recovered then we put her in the coop and while they were free ranging she couldent runn fast enough cuz she was still really skinny and my dog killed her but that method should work
     
  5. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Withdraw the molasses, as it's only to be given for four hours as a flush. Bring him indoors immediately (as in prepare an area, and go out there 'n get him tonight), most esp. for the added warmth, but also to isolate him from the flock (for both his good, and theirs).

    Rather than havin' any doubts about the feed supply? Go pick up some fresh pellets ... you can always feed the other feeds later, if it turns out to have been fine (I'm esp. worried about aflatoxins).

    Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) at the rate of four teaspoons to the gallon of water (but never in galvanized metal containers) will serve to 'cut through' the coatings in their mouths, throats and intestines, making it easier for them to expel the mucus. This also improves the uptake of nutrient/vitamins, and any medication(s) offered. This is also a treatment for toxins, most esp. those produced by botulism. It has the potential to save some birds, but none whatsoever to do 'em any harm -- give this to the entire flock.

    Treatments for internal parasites I'd consider, even when birds are very ill ...
    • Amprolium, which blocks the thiamin uptake of coccidia, to which they're fifty times more sensitive than the host. Green/runny droppings are sometimes indicative, esp. if bloody.
    • Fenbendazole, at the rate of 25 mg/kg for three consecutive days, so as to eliminate all worms (except tapeworms, which probably aren't the problem, as you would have most probably seen evidence of 'em by now). This anthelmintic has be tested/proven safe, all the way up to 1,000 mg/kg of body weight.
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    He needs to be warm, then hydrated. Can you do that?
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Epsom salts in people can cause dehydration, and should never be used in cats, but I don't remember why. Since he can't hold his head up, hydrating him orally might not be an option, but if you don't have sterile fluids, it's probably your only choice.

    Here is some info on heat and fluids from some of my other replies.

    http://www.avianweb.com/sickbirdcare.html
    http://www.harrisonsbirdfoods.com/avmed/ampa/15.pdf
    http://www.harrisonsbirdfoods.com/avmed/cam/07_emergency_and_critical



    From:http://www.avianweb.com/sickbirdcare.html
    Warmth is critical. Your bird's environment should be kept at about 90 degrees. A hospital cage would be great, as it would keep the temperature at the level you want. But most people don't have that available and an acrylic bird carrier or fish tank available at pet stores can potentially be substituted. If you use one of those, you have to monitor the temperature quite carefully. This being said, putting a sick bird into a new environment may be stressful. Maybe placing the cage into a small room that can easily be heated (small bathroom, for example) might do. Drape a heavy cover on one of the sides, but make sure that the bird doesn't "sit in the dark" -- except at night. Potential heat sources can be a heating pad underneath the cage, hot bottles or heat lamps. Of course, the heat lamps shouldn't be used at night, as your pet needs to rest. Maybe a combination of heating pad at night and a heat lamp during the day might be an option. Do whatever works best for you.


    From: http://www.harrisonsbirdfoods.com/avmed/cam/07_emergency_and_critical_care.pdf
    Sick birds are often hypothermic and should be placed in heated (brooder-type) enclosures (Fig 7.7) in a quiet environment (see Chapter 1, Clinical Practice). A temperature of 85° F (29° C) with 70% humidity is desirable for most sick birds. If brooders are not equipped with a humidity source, placing a small dish of water in the enclosure will often supply adequate humidity. A moist towel that is heated and placed on the bottom of a cage or incubator rapidly humidifies the environment, as indicated by the fogging of the acrylic cage front.

    Source: http://www.harrisonsbirdfoods.com/avmed/cam/07_emergency_and_critical_care.pdf
    FLUID THERAPY

    Oral Administration
    Oral administration is the ideal method of giving fluids.
    This method is more commonly used in mildly dehydrated
    birds or in conjunction with subcutaneous (SC)
    or intravenous (IV) therapy. Oral rehydration (30 ml/kg
    PO q 6-8 h) also may be used in larger birds (eg, waterfowl)
    that are difficult to restrain for parenteral fluid
    therapy.
     
  8. thompsonfarm

    thompsonfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He is eating and drinking fine. Today I took a closer look at his skin and I think we might have a might issue going on here. Could this be the root of all this. I will stop the molassis ASAP. He is in the garage should I put a lamp on him? I can bring him in we have 4 dogs and no where to put him,
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Heat, heat heat... of course he should have a lamp, but only if he can move away from it. Can he walk? A Jersey Giant rooster should weigh about 13 pounds. If he is purebred and doesn't weigh at least 10 pounds, he's not eating/drinking enough, IMNSHO.

    What's wrong with his skin? Now you got me thinking Merek's...
     
  10. thompsonfarm

    thompsonfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have read that with botulism you should not heat the body, just isolate and stay draft free. I can see mites on his skin. I don't see any skin irritation though.
     

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