1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Please help with info...

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by JesCelina, Nov 22, 2015.

  1. JesCelina

    JesCelina Out Of The Brooder

    18
    0
    29
    May 24, 2015
    Fenton Mi
    Our chickens are now 7 mos and have yet to lay eggs [​IMG]. We are still feeding flock raiser and was wondering if it would be ok to add cracked corn at this time? doing everything I can to make sure they are staying warm. we had our 1st winter storm here in MI and so far they are not liking the snow!! we have 3 girls with the coop and run so they have plenty of room. I also use pine shavings for bedding. too add, i'm a little concerned as to why they have not started laying yet. any advice would surely be appreciated [​IMG]
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

    21,475
    2,427
    458
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    I don't think corn will help them lay. It is a good source of energy but low in protein. Corn is already the main ingredient in most chicken feed.

    Birds maturing in Autumn or Winter may be quite delayed in commencement of lay. It is the shortening days vs. lengthening that makes the difference.
    To take the mystery out of it, here's a brief rundown of the science.
    Light exposure to the retina is first relayed to the nucleus of the hypothalamus, an area of the brain that coordinates biological clock signals. Fibers from there descend to the spinal cord and then project to the superior cervical ganglia, from which neurons ascend back to the pineal gland. The pineal gland translates signals from the nervous system into a hormonal signal.

    The gland produces serotonin and subsequently, melatonin. That's the hormone that affects the gonads for sperm production and ovulation in females. An increase in melatonin causes the gonads to become inactive. As photoperiod in relation to day vs. night is the most important clue for animals to determine season. As light lengthens, the gonads are rejuvenated. The duration of melatonin secretion each day is directly proportional to the length of the night because of the pineal gland's ability to measure daylength. Besides reproduction, it also affects sleep timing and blood pressure regulation.
     
    2 people like this.
  3. shell shocked

    shell shocked Chillin' With My Peeps

    602
    91
    93
    Aug 21, 2015
    liverpool england
    hello to you
    start feeding them a good quality layers pellet or mash i feed pellet less waste
    it should be at least 16 percent protein it will contain all they need you can put some grit
    in a corner just in case they need it i hang a cabbage up every three days keeps them fit
    jumping up to rip bits off you can give them the odd treat a few mealworms now and again
    or earth worms or very small seed like rape linseed millet but make them work for it they love
    rooting round i only give mine corn last thing about an hour before bed time it keeps them warm
    over night never give it to them early or they will fill them self up and wont eat the layers pellet
    anyway i hope this has been of some help
    good luck
    [​IMG]
     
  4. MadamPoofyBrow

    MadamPoofyBrow Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,158
    131
    148
    Jun 15, 2015
    What breed are they? That's really important in deciding if it's natural, or they need something to help them start.
    For example, breeds like Silkies, Polish, more ornamental breeds don't start laying until often over a year old.
    Layer breeds, like RIR, leghorn, the works, will lay earlier and should have already started.
    I have 4 Cochin girls that will be turning a year old this December and haven't layed the first egg. Their brothers ust started crowing this month. Some breeds just mature much slower than others.
     
  5. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    6,608
    881
    328
    Sep 13, 2011
    Continue to feed Flock Raiser at least until most are laying eggs; then you could switch gradually to a layer feed, or stay with it and add oyster shell on the side. I have a 40w bulb on a timer that runs 4 am to 8 am every day, so birds are more likely to lay eggs all winter. Pullets start laying eggs at different ages, depending on breed and family lines. My worst were some show bred Ameracaunas that started at 11 months of age! I was horrified, and have stuck with Easter Eggers since then. Patience is a good thing... Mary
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. shell shocked

    shell shocked Chillin' With My Peeps

    602
    91
    93
    Aug 21, 2015
    liverpool england
    hi yer
    i dont think breed has a lot to do with what you feed your girls all birds need protein for
    growth tissue repair and for immunity against disease. fats and carbohydrates are used to provide
    heat and energy any surplus stored as body fat small amounts of fibre is needed to keep the bowels working vitamins and minerals are needed to maintain health the latter also being used for bone and eggshells in the wild a bird can get all the fats carbohydrates plant and animal proteins
    it requires plus naturally occurring vitamins and minerals but most domesticated chicken no
    longer have the freedom to make up their own nutritional package so its up to us to make sure
    they get a well balanced diet the fact that layer pellets are balanced is crucial so unless you are
    a nutritional chemist and can make your own formulation it makes sense to me to use the best feed
    in order to get the best results in terms of overall health egg laying fertility or getting your girls up to show condition after 18 weeks you need to be off growers there is to much protein in it
    well good luck with your girls


    [​IMG]
     
  7. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    Are you providing any supplemental light?
    Its winter and the days are short. They will start laying in the spring once the daylight hours get longer.
     
  8. JesCelina

    JesCelina Out Of The Brooder

    18
    0
    29
    May 24, 2015
    Fenton Mi
    Thank you so Much Shell!! I really appreciate your reply and will definently try ALL of these suggestions! Keeping my fingers crossed that this helps ;)
     
  9. JesCelina

    JesCelina Out Of The Brooder

    18
    0
    29
    May 24, 2015
    Fenton Mi
    Hi Madam!! I have 1 austrthhorp and 2 wyandotts ;)
     
  10. JesCelina

    JesCelina Out Of The Brooder

    18
    0
    29
    May 24, 2015
    Fenton Mi
    No Light, I wanted to try that but was suggested not to...
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2015

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by