Please help :(

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by FrankieMcElfresh, Jul 16, 2011.

  1. FrankieMcElfresh

    FrankieMcElfresh Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 30, 2011
    Ohio
    Okay I got 10 new chickens to go with the 10 I already have and my older chickens have been attacking the new ones, i dont know what to do really, i have been keeping them seperated, the new chickens are about a month or so young than the older ones, below are pics, when I went out this morning to check on them my one rooster came up to one of my new chickens and jumped on him and pulled feathers out, thats when I seperated them all, anything I can do? will this stop eventually? [​IMG]

    NEW CHICKENS:
    [​IMG]

    OLDER CHICKENS:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Jeffross1968

    Jeffross1968 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 14, 2011
    Smoky Mountains
    If there is a way to keep them separate but still visible to each other, so they can in some ways interact for as long as possible before reintroducing them, that's the way to go. I have 4 little ones that are months younger than the rest of my flock. They have a separate little coop/run that they stay in until early afternoon. Then I let them out to free range with the older ones. At first, there was some chasing and pecking. But being out free ranging means they have the ability to run away. Over the last couple weeks they have begun to better exist together, though still sleeping in different coops. They are maybe 12 weeks old. I highly doubt I'll let them sleep with the older flock until they are full grown, so as to better protect themselves.

    However, do know that no matter when it happens, there will be some shuffling in the pecking order, and that will mean some nastiness.
     
  3. willkatdawson

    willkatdawson Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 31, 2008
    Ga
    If you can free range them together so the younger ones can get away when needed, that would be great. As far as the older rooster goes, his goal in life is to keep the hens to himself, and get rid of all other rooster anywhere around 'his' flock. Depending on his attitude, he may mellow in time, but one of the roosters will be top roo. How they get there, can be through body language or out and out fighting.
     
  4. FrankieMcElfresh

    FrankieMcElfresh Out Of The Brooder

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    0
    39
    Jun 30, 2011
    Ohio
    In my chicken room I have these cages set up with the new chickens in them so the older ones and the new ones can see each other just cant be bullied lol

    [​IMG]
     
  5. ThinkingChickens

    ThinkingChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 18, 2011
    I used an x pen (for dogs) and created a little safety zone for our babies. They've been in with the big girls so they can see each other and hear each other. Then occasionally we've let them all free range together slowly adding time. The younger girls are almost 9 weeks and the bigger girls are 24 weeks. We're hoping by the time the walk in run is complete (two-three weeks) they'll all be able to hang together much of the day.
     
  6. KristyAz

    KristyAz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 29, 2011
    Mishawaka, Indiana
    When I introduced my babies to the flock, I started out with them in their cage, in the run. The other older chickens were curious at first. In a day or so I opened the door to the cage, but facing the outside of the run, so they could get out, but were sort of caged in the corner and the bigger ones couldn't figure out how to get them, and didn't try. The babies could go in and out of their cage, get on top and explore at their own pace. They were beginning to be old news by now to the older ones. I turned the cage around eventually. I also put them in the coop at night with the rest, but inside their cage. Within a week or so, they were completely integrated. Nothing horrible happened, no one got injured, and they are part of the big flock now.
     
  7. ThinkingChickens

    ThinkingChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 18, 2011
    Quote:This is so great to hear! I'm hoping to have the same outcome. What were the age differences with yours when you started?
     

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