please tell me the genetics of recessive genes (specifically wry tail)

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by popcornpuppy, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. popcornpuppy

    popcornpuppy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a young cockeral that was looking very promising. He has a great body, and the markings I am looking for in my Delaware flock. The only problem------ he has wry tail [​IMG]
    After reading up on wry tail I know I CAN NOT BREED HIM. I know this is a recessive gene but if I breed him, most of his offspring will have the tail issue.
    So my question is if I breed this cokeral's mom and dad to find more offspring with the body type and coloration that I am looking for, how many of thier offspring will show up with wry tails? Is it like a 1 in a 1000 chance or is the chance much greater?

    Here are a couple of pics so that you may see how sever the wry tail is in my cockeral. His tail hooks sharply tp the right side.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Boy, I sure wish I knew more poultry genetics. I don't have a clue.
    Heck, I would sure try hatching out more chicks from his parents. Worth a try. [​IMG]
     
  3. popcornpuppy

    popcornpuppy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Kathy. I hope some folks who know genetics will lend a hand here. I am still researching genetics and was not sure if I hit the eqivilent of the genetic lottery. Was the wry tail a rare thing that popped up like a fluke? If I use the same parents to mate again will they keep throwing wry tails because they both have the gene?

    Need some help [​IMG]
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I know that each parent has to have the gene for the trait to express itself in the offspring. Not sure how many will have it, but even the ones that don't may carry the gene and when combined with another bird with it, bam! you'll have more.

    I haven't seen any wry tail in my Dels, though a BR cockerel I used to own had it as well as one BR pullet. I didn't breed either of them. Never saw it before or since so guess I sold the right birds.

    Hopefully, someone who knows more will pop in soon.
     
  5. blackdotte

    blackdotte Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wry tail is an autosomal recessive. This means it is carried by both parents.
    Let us call wry tail 'wt' , and the normal lack of wry tail, 'Wt+'
    This bird is wt/wt
    Both parents (if they looked to have normal tails) were Wt+/wt
    Mating them together will give three combinations
    Wt+/Wt+ normal tails
    Wt+/wt (twice as many) normal tails but carrying the recessive wt gene
    wt/wt wry tailed bird
     
  6. popcornpuppy

    popcornpuppy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the reply dotte.
    If I understand correctly, I have a 33% chance of seeing more wry tails from that same pair of parents. I have a 66% chance of seing it in future generations because I would need to get genetict testing done to see who is likely to throw wry tails since the carriers would not physically show signs of wry tail but carry the full set of genes to throw to their offspring.
    So, am I following correctly?
     
  7. blackdotte

    blackdotte Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes
     
  8. danhonour

    danhonour Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The genetic advice is correct.If you know who the sire was,cull him.If you know his dam cull her too.Definitely do not use the wry tailed cockerel or you increase your chances of getting many more.By culling a few now you will prevent culling lots in the future.
     
  9. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    With any recessive gene you end up with a 25% chance (not 33%) if both parents carry the gene but don't exhibit the trait.
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:I think the 33% was based upon three possibilities. However, if you look at a punnet sqaure you see why it is 25%. Using Blackdotte's Wt+ and wt, this is how it plays out when both parents are split for the recessive wt.


    Wt+
    | wt

    |
    Wt+ Wt+ Wt+ | Wt+ wt
    |
    wt Wt+ wt | wt wt





    There is a 25% chance that an offspring will be pure for the recessive gene, a 25% chance that an offspring will be pure for the dominant gene, a 25% chance that the offspring will inherit the dominant from papa and the recessive from mama and a 25% chance that the offspring will inherit recessive from papa & dominant from mama. The later two combine for a 50% chance of the offspring being split.
     

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