Polish Poof - cutting pin feathers - OUCH???

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by operator16, Jun 25, 2010.

  1. operator16

    operator16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2010
    Colorado
    I know it may be a dumb question...

    This is the second time I've cut the poof on my two Polish gals so they could see better. The first time, I trimmed and had to paint their heads with blue food coloring to cover their pink scalps from peeking through the sparse white feathers so they would be left alone. This was very successful.

    Their scarce poofs have turned into HUGE, PUFFY, cotton-ball like hats - just shy of the size of a baseball. When cutting today, I hit some pin feathers that bleed. OW! I'm concerned. Is there any feeling in those feathers?

    I've washed their heads so there is no red, dried them, painted them blue again and they seems very happy and are running all over to explore and seem to be really checking out the place like it's new... In fact it's the first time I've seen them really engage in some chest bumping.

    Are we ok?
     
  2. gootziecat

    gootziecat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 27, 2007
    Hampshire Co, WV
    Operator 16,

    I don't know if breaking or cutting a pinfeather is painful to chickens or not. I know for caged birds, the pinfeathers are sensitive, and any bleeding must be stopped as if could result in a serious loss of blood. Your chickens are bigger, so they probably wouldn't lose that much blood. If it were me, I'd error on the safe side and not cut pinfeathers. Any blood feathers should be cut above the quill. They'll just look like they have a flat top. heehee.
     
  3. operator16

    operator16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2010
    Colorado
    Here's some advice... Don't Google "Chicken Pin Feathers" and look for images... Dang!

    Ok, I think I was cutting the shaft of larger feathers since they were not bloody - just dry and hollow. There was one little one above her nose that developed a drop of blood on it. I must have gotten too close there. I thought all the shafts were pin feathers. I am still learning. I wonder if it's ok to cut those shafts? I'm going to try to repost with a different heading. Did I put it in the right area?
     
  4. gootziecat

    gootziecat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Cutting the shaft with dry and hollow feathers doesn't hurt a thing. People cut that part of the wing feathers to disable a bird from flying. You must be careful you don't cut a bloodfeather. As to where to repost, this one or maybe Managing Your Flock.
     
  5. crtrlovr

    crtrlovr Still chillin' with my peeps

    Quote:When you're getting ready to cut ANY feather, look at the shaft. If it looks plump and gray or bluish color, it is a blood feather. If you cut it, it WILL hurt, and it WILL bleed. If the bleeding is not stopped, it can kill your bird. Feathers with a white, dry looking shaft that is hard and has no "give" in the shaft when gently pressed at the base or side are mature and can be cut without pain or bleeding. (at least on the part of the bird -- if your bird is not gentle, the bleeding and pain may be all your own! [​IMG] )
     
  6. If you manage to cut a pin that is full of blood, then eventually you will cause problems. Yes, these feathers do in fact hurt when pulled or the shafts pinched.

    If you cut a pin with blood you COULD cause the bird to "bleed out" . It would have to be a pretty big one though.

    I pwm am umbrella cockatoo and those pinns with blood are always avoided. If you are going to remove these pins it is better to pull them so they will not bleed.


    I love polish chickens. they are such a hoot.
     
  7. crtrlovr

    crtrlovr Still chillin' with my peeps

    if you do accidentally cut a blood feather, if the bleeding does not stop when you apply a clotting agent such as kwikstop or even flour, baking powder, or alum from your kitchen cabinet, you may have to pull the feather shaft out completely. Use small pliers to grasp the shaft as close to the skin as possible, and firmly tug the feather shaft out. Do not JERK the shaft out, or you could injure your bird. [​IMG]
     

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