polish rooster in the cold

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by highwindsfarm, Apr 6, 2009.

  1. highwindsfarm

    highwindsfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2009
    The "exotic" chick in my pullet order was a white Polish cockerel. It gets quite cold here in western NY. My daughter would like to keep him to show at 4-H, but if he lives here he will be with the layers (free range by day, chicken tractor at night). Can a Polish male tolerate our winters?
     
  2. horsegirl

    horsegirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2009
    It depends, I kept polish fine in Minnesota, but we have a heated barn which the chicken coop is right off of, so even when it is -30 outside, it is still 40 degrees F inside.

    They do not have the same comb to freeze off like other chickens which is in your favor, especially with all those feathers up there. I think if your other hens do fine, he should be able to tolerate it, he probably will not stay in as good of condition as the heavier breeds, but what else would you do?
     
  3. highwindsfarm

    highwindsfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2009
    How is the temperment of your polish? I've heard their restricted vision can make them spooky. I also heard their crest feathers get wet alot when they drink.
     
  4. horsegirl

    horsegirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2009
    I actually have bantam polish and they are nice with pretty calm temerments. Their crests do cover their eyes, but they seem to get along well enough with the other chickens as well. I had heard that their temperments can be wacky too, but personally have not found that.

    We have never had a problem with the crested feathers getting wet when they drink, we have actually not had any problems with them. My nicest hen got outside once and ended up stuck out there all night (-20 degrees F) and she ended up just fine once she warmed up again, no frozen toes or anything. We found her hiding under the horse trailer.

    The area where the polish bantams are is larger than where the majority of the chickens stay and besides them there are only like 30 other birds in there, so they do have lots of space and whatnot.

    I do not know how to put pictures on here otherwise I would! You could go to
    http://highlandgrovefarm.110mb.com/poultry.html
    her picture is towards the top, in fact it might be the first photo. It was taken before she had her full crest, but I still think she is cute!
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2009
  5. Julie08

    Julie08 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 19, 2008
    Ontario, Canada
    I've had polish in Canada no problems with cold, wet feathers or temperament they are great birds.
     
  6. ThePolishPrincess

    ThePolishPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

    We live in NY and our Polish fares very well, in fact, better than some of our other chooks. In rain, the crest feather turn into dread-locks which can get dirty and prove to be a problem when showing time comes around, trust me. [​IMG] In snow, the feathers tend to dangle in front of the head and literally turn to icicles, which clang together and become an annoyance to the poor chook. But Patty doesn't complain.

    Keep an eye on him as Polish are generally VERY bad in extreme weather. Even as chicks, mortality rates are high because of temps and illness. Be aware, but don't be worried.
     
  7. Toast n Jelly

    Toast n Jelly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    St.Charles, QC
    Quote:Simple solution is to tie up the crest with an elastic. Mine act like normal chickens when they can see like the othes.
     
  8. highwindsfarm

    highwindsfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    What a good idea, I always have an elastic around my wrist for my own ponytail. Thanks for all the feedback!
     
  9. bmcreighton

    bmcreighton New Egg

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    Aug 19, 2008
    S. New Hampshire
    I have a polish rooster that survives winters in New England. The coop is unheated except for a basic heat lamp and it is a little drafty. They just all huddle together for warmth.
     

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