Pollurum testing for swaps

Discussion in 'Chickenstocks, Shows, Meet-Ups' started by tiki244, Apr 30, 2008.

  1. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    In Wisc we have to have this test---is it that way in your states?
     
  2. runamuck

    runamuck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In michigan NO it is not required I personally think it should be and when and if ( Gas prices) I make the swap any bird I consider getting will be tested on the spot before I head for home. I will also offer it to anyone who like it at the swap too .
     
  3. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    runamuck I have bad news,,,,,I had to get rid of my modern game roo,,,,,but I have a contact number I can give you for SQ bbredmgb seriously SQ will PM
     
  4. boilerjoe_96

    boilerjoe_96 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Could anyone help me out about what all is involved with getting this test done or getting the certification?

    I only have 25 chickens or so, but if I want to swap I might need one...Not economical if costly or troublesome to get...

    PS...sorry don't mean to highjack the thread...
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2008
  5. Crunchie

    Crunchie Brook Valley Farm

    Mar 1, 2007
    Maryland
    Quote:Check with your state's department of agriculture, each state has its own requirements. For me, in Maryland, testing is free. Pullorum and AI testing is required for anyone wanting to sell live birds or hatching eggs in MD; I imagine that a lot of states have similar requirements. I would do it if you plan to sell any birds. It's easy and gives buyers peace of mind that the birds have come from a "clean" flock.
     
  6. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    yeah I am getting to the point where it is gowing to be easier to do the NPIP cert and I think that is free here and a yearly visit
     
  7. mothergoose

    mothergoose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It is free here in Illinois too. My husband is also a certified tester, so that makes it nice for us too.
    Christie [​IMG]
     
  8. MsMcChick

    MsMcChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am a certified tester in Michigan. It's easier to get the kids to shows and fairs not having to go find someone to fit my schedule. One thing you have to be careful with the pollorum testing is that the test is ONLY good if you don't introduce new birds into your flock. If you introduce a new bird, either test it first during the quarntine time, or you'll be testing them all again! I also test for the 4-H club and for the county Poultry Developmental Commitee during the county shows, it sure comes in handy! The class in MI is $15, but we can choose whether or not to charge for testing individuals birds (the antigen is between $40 & $60 depending where you buy it, sometimes it helps to charge a small fee per bird)
     
  9. boilerjoe_96

    boilerjoe_96 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    again sorry for the highjack..but...

    Each bird has to have blood drawn....2 ml? Per Indiana's web site....

    'Pullorum-Typhoid blood testing can be completed by sending a two (2) ml sample of blood serum from each bird to an NPIP-approved laboratory, such as Purdue University’s Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratories '

    So this is a pain in the a...rear....

    I have birds from 2 weeks to 13 months and 27 birds...

    I have to draw blood from 27 birds? hardly seems easy...

    Edited for typo
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2008
  10. mothergoose

    mothergoose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here in Illinois, and I am assuming it is the same or close everywhere.
    The first inital test is a major undertaking if you have a large flock.
    Every bird over 4 months of age or at sexual maturity (which ever comes first) has to be bloodtested. Here the USDA animal inspector has to come and do the first inital test.
    Then after the inital test, you only test a percentage of your flock once a year ( percentage depends on your flock size)

    New birds you get throughout the year from outside your tested flock have to be quarantined & tested also.

    It seems like a pain, but really is'nt that bad, especially if you take the testers class and can do your own.

    Christie
     

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