Possible Coccidiosis, how long can he last till I get treatment?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Maddison, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. Maddison

    Maddison Songster

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    This night as I was putting my young roo in the laundry after a massive storm basically destroyed everyone's coops (its a long story...) as I put him on the floor he did a poop that looked to have blood in it, it was a yellowish/clear poop, the colour wasn't strong but I'm fairly certain there was blood... could this be cocci or stress? it was quite a storm and everyone was freaked out... if its cocci how long can he last before I can get treatment? he was confined in an small area as I was building his permanent coop at the time, and it was a blazing hot summer so we had a spray hose on all the coops, which probably didn't help the disease stay away... I've actually not long learned how cocci actually arise, or I wouldn't have put the spray on the coops in the first place, it will be difficult but I will have to find another way to cool them down. on an unrelated note, tips on how to cool down chooks on a hot Australian day? p.s he isn't showing any other cocci symptoms.
     
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  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    How old is he and how is he acting? Have there been other bloody droppings since you saw the first? If he looks alert, active, and is eating and drinking normally, it may not be coccidiosis.

    Sometimes chickens will have a small amount of intestinal shedding that may be orangey-red and normal occasionally. The only way to confirm coccidiosis is to get some fresh droppings checked by a vet. Or you may buy some amprollium, toltrazuril, or sulfa antibiotic to treat the possible problem.

    If you see another bloody stool soon, take a picture or start treatment.
     
  3. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    Cocci is EVERY single chicken poo and therefor ALWAYS present.

    It only becomes an issue when they are allowed to bloom out of control usually in warm humid conditions like those you mention.

    Some poos have a little intestinal lining in them and are completely normal even though they can look a little like blood.

    Actually only 1 out of the 9 forms of cocci will present as blood in the stool. And even then it may not be every single stool even from the same bird.

    With no other cocci symptoms I personally would not treat. However if you choose too, should treat everyone. The most common Corid (amprol or amprolium is actual drug name), simply acts as a thiamine blocker to starve out the cocci. So it won't hurt them if you treat and they aren't overloaded with them. It may not benefit them either and be a waste of your $ and time.

    YES, lot's of ways to cool your shook...

    Frozen gallon jug water bottles with a fan blowing directly over. Frozen peas (my favorite for protein content), or corn or mixed veg added into some ice cube trays with extra water and frozen for them to work at getting to. Chilled or frozen watermelon, cantaloupe halves or chunks. Everything mentioned should be a treat though. And I particularly like to provide the cold stuff in the hottest part of the day. A fan make an average temperature difference FEELING of about 4 degrees. But if too high could actually seem more like a convection oven maybe. Bare dirt in the shade is a nice cooling dirt bath. Grass tends to be more humid and warm to me.
     
    nminusyplusm and Hen Pen Jem like this.
  4. Saaniya

    Saaniya Crowing

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    Hey hi..
    Sorry u r in trouble
    Pls post some pics of poo
    And make 2-3 garlic close paste dilute in half cup of water give it to ur ill roo till u get the medicine.. Garlic kill coccidia so it will prevent any further damage if there's not so serious
     
    Hen Pen Jem and Maddison like this.
  5. Maddison

    Maddison Songster

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    he Was born on 15th of sep so nearly 4 months old. this is the first bloody poop i've seen, its definitly red but a pale red. hes also very lively as usual. the vets here are actually quite 'idiotic' when it comes to chickens, I doubt they'd be able to examine let alone diagnose a sample, they mostly deal with larger livestock.
     
    Saaniya likes this.
  6. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    Oooh, maybe meal worms frozen into ice cubes. Chickens.. :drool Me... :sick

    And freezing up their water so it melts throughout the day and stays cool during the process. Of course making sure there is enough access that isn't frozen.
     
    nminusyplusm likes this.
  7. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    Many species carry coccidia. It is diagnosed in a fecal float in the same manner as worms. They would actually just be doing a load count and SHOULD be able to be done at ANY vet. It does not include an exam and I agree they often know little about birds unless they are an avian vet and there doesn't seem to be a glut of them.
     
  8. Maddison

    Maddison Songster

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    Oct 23, 2017
    Rural NSW Australia
    I know that theres an avian vet 40 mins away, but considering our car is under the rubble that used to be our shed I don't think we'll be traveling anytime soon...
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    Look at any feed or agricultural stores for amprollium, since it is commonly used to treat other farm animals. If you can order it by mail, there will be sources to find it. If he is not acting sick, I would just make sure that he is drinking well and eating.
     
    Wyorp Rock and Maddison like this.
  10. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    That sounds terrible! :(

    We all have to do what is within our means and do our best. Many could not afford the vet even with access. But it's great that this community has so much combined experience and most are super willing to share it.

    If you've seen one (maybe) bloody poo... you do have time. I agree with the other poster, that if he isn't showing any other indicators... I would just ensure that he is eating and drinking. And keep my eye open for any change or more suspicious droppings.

    It's my understanding that garlic works against fungus like athletes foot... but I have seen some with mold on it. Do you have a source for your info that I can look at? Thanks. :pop
     

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