Possible poisoning

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Mr Beaks, Jun 12, 2016.

  1. Mr Beaks

    Mr Beaks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A few days ago I noticed our rooster was missing which is unusual as he is always there with his girls. I found him laying in the barn behind a brooder. I thought he was trying to escape the heat so I put him back out with the hens, dampened the area under the deck where they like to hang out and went about my business. Each day he has bouts of inactivity but was eating, drinking and foraging with the others. Friday evening I found him behind the grow-out coop with his head tucked under it like he was trying to hide. I brought him inside, examined him, gave him vitamins and electrolytes and bathed him as he had poo stuck to his bum. No injuries found, no signs of illness. Yesterday he began projectile pooping (mostly water with tiny green bits) which hasn't subsided and he is lame and lethargic. Today he is leaning on his side, neck stretched to the side w/head touching wing, legs are stiff and he is having spasms. DH is certain the neighbor has poisoned him. ALL other flock members okay so far.
    I know he is in pain and suffering and as hard as it is I think I need to have him put down. If I do so does this eliminate the possibility of having a necropsy done (to check for disease/poison)? Our vet is closed so another vet (not avian) said I could bring him in now for euthanasia. I cannot bear watching him suffer another day, I love my boy dearly. Any (gentle) advice would be appreciated.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Sorry about your rooster. I would definitely get a necropsy done by your state vet. After your vet sees him to euthanise, refrigerate his body in a plastic bag, but don't freeze. Then early Monday, call the state vet at the dept. of agriculture, and tell them the details, asking sbout a necropsy. It may be an illness or something he got into to eat, but I hope he wasn't poisoned. Let us know if you get the necropsy.
     
  3. Mr Beaks

    Mr Beaks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for the reply and the advice. He was put down about an hour after I posted. Words cannot express how much that hurt. I plan on taking him to the lab in Turlock in the morning as they do necropsy there. If it was a disease it will be found. I only wish I would have thought to ask for bloodwork to be done beforehand to check for toxins/poisons. Still, I have a hard time believing someone would target our rooster but DH is completely convinced. I do hope he is wrong. I will post an update as the findings become available. Thank you for being there for those of us in need. It is truly appreciated!
     
  4. jennyf

    jennyf Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am so sorry for your loss. Hope the necropsy is helpful.
     
  5. Mr Beaks

    Mr Beaks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is the preliminary report which indicates systemic staph? More results are pending but am curious how this could have happened as he had no bumblefoot or other injuries that I could see. Mr. Beaks and son had gotten into a couple of fights which left both their faces bloody. The coops and run are kept clean on a daily basis but impossible to keep immaculate. Is this something that can be passed along in the flock and should I treat all members with antibiotics or am I jumping the gun? I will try to attach a copy of the prelim in case I am misunderstanding something. Thank you for your time.
     
  6. Mr Beaks

    Mr Beaks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Won't let me post report. Any suggestions?
     
  7. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    Mail the report to a moderator via the Private message system and ask the moderator to post it for you.
     
  8. Mr Beaks

    Mr Beaks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for the suggestion! I'll give it a try in the morning as it is well past midnight here. Thanks again.
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Did he have any swelling or redness in his joints, since he was lame? Looking forward to seeing your report. Here are a couple of links to read about staphyloccoccal infection of joints:
    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/p...infectious_skeletal_disorders_in_poultry.html
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/143/staphylococcosis-staphylococcal-arthritis-bumble-foot/
    http://articles.extension.org/pages/68112/staphylococcus-in-poultry


    The following is a short quote from a study in the Iraqi Veterinary Journal:

    The most frequent sites of Staphylococcus aureus infections in poultry were bones, tendons, sheaths and joints, especially tibiotarsal and stifle joints (11). In the present study Staphylococcus aureus was isolated at the percentage of 50.98%, same results (11,12). The bacterium is considered to be normal resident of the chicken, located on the skin, feathers and in the respiratory tracts. This organism must enter the circulatory system to cause disease, thus probability of infection is increased by any injury that provides the bacteria with rout of entry (2,6). Arthritis is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, but Escherichia coli and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae are some times involved as are, rarely other bacteria . This result was similar to (11). Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus was found to be sensitive to amoxycillin and resistant to gentamycin, novobiocin the same results reported (11). Experimental inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus isolate to 35 days old chickens showed bacteremia after 24 hours and increased during 96 hours (14). Bacteremia is an essential prerequisite to occur diseases this agreed (15). Clinical signs and post mortem findings confined to depression, lameness, swollen joint, and unable to stand (5,16). Joint infections occurred with in 48-120 hours. The affected joints showed increase of synovial fluid which was turbid and yellowish this founded (17). Staphylococci have a high affinity for collagen-rich surfaces such as the articular surface of joints, and synovial sheaths located around joints and tendons. This organism also tends to localize in the growth plate of actively growing bones (18). Staphylococcal infection is the most real important causes of arthritis leading to economic losses in the broiler chickens as high morbidity swollen joint thus we must take care to control the Staphylococcal infection in poultry.
     

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