Possibly a little roo??

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by SharynJoy, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. SharynJoy

    SharynJoy Out Of The Brooder

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    We had our chicks outside for quite a while earlier today, and I noticed one has a much larger comb than all the others. Then, my daughter noticed it has the beginnings of a wattle. We got them as day old chicks, so they are all the same age. They are all supposed to be pullets, but I know there is not a 100% guarantee! Anyway, having a roo won't be horrible. They grow to be good protectors of the flock. Here's a picture of his face:[​IMG]
     
  2. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    A picture of the whole bird, profile shot including legs and head is good. Age of the bird is very helpful, also.
     
  3. SharynJoy

    SharynJoy Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh, I'm sorry! Forgot to say they are 5 weeks old. Here is a profile picture:[​IMG]
     
  4. Mr MKK FARMS

    Mr MKK FARMS Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Yeah, that is a cockerel. I am sorry.
     
  5. SharynJoy

    SharynJoy Out Of The Brooder

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    How can you tell? I'm just curious! No apologies!! It's ok as long as we don't have another in the mix ;-)
     
  6. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    The single combed breeds are almost all similar in that the cockerels sprout red combs and wattles at 6 weeks. The pullets won't sprout much of anything until they are closer to sexual maturity. That is ones first sign. The males are also set on stouter legs and stand taller. The males will be "heads up" as that will be their job, to be watchful. Being taller helps with that. They'll also need to be leggier to better mount the females. That too is their job, so nature forms them this way.

    The male's head is often shaped differently as well. Soon, he will feather out much more exotically, as a rule, than the female. She is often more bland so better to be camouflaged while nesting. She is smaller and lower to the ground. Nature makes her this way in order to better lay eggs and be mounted in mating.

    This difference becomes something the eye grows in its ability to note. After you've seen hundreds, if not thousands of chicks, one becomes accustomed to seeing the difference in male and female as easily as seeing the difference say, in a male Robin and a female Robin in yard in spring.

    Yes, it is 100% cockerel. Congratulations, you have a boy.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  7. SharynJoy

    SharynJoy Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you so much!! You have taught me a lot :)
     
  8. LUVMYCHIKAS

    LUVMYCHIKAS Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 13, 2013
    Eastern Shore of Md
    Handsome fello!
     
  9. SharynJoy

    SharynJoy Out Of The Brooder

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    Do you happen to know what breed he is? We ordered the hatchery brown egg pullet special. Looking through the catalog, we're thinking it's a Production Red...
     
  10. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    You are correct. A production red.
     

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