Pot belly pigs

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by firechicken, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. firechicken

    firechicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was wondering if pot belly pigs are good for anything other then being a pet.
    Do people eat them?

    Just curious.
     
  2. LynnGrigg

    LynnGrigg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ...yep. People do eat them. We had one. She was a nice pet and NO we didn't eat her. We did end up rehoming her to a rural animal loving family with children. She had far more attention that way. We have two properties, the second was inherited and we ended up traveling a lot. We felt that she deserved more personal time than we had to give her. Pot bellied pigs live a long time and require attention. Although Squeeker wasn't aggressive(I used to take my sleeping bag out to the barn in nice weather and she'd crawl in with me to spend the night), they can be aggressive and their teeth are sharp. -Not something you want to get into without doing some research first. Of course no animal/pet is something you want to get without learning about it first and seriously taking into consideration what you as the owner will have to do in order to take care of it.
     
  3. Cheri

    Cheri Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had two and no I didn't eat them. [​IMG] Mr. Pibb was extremely sexually agressive, if you get a male I would nueter him. He got lost and some dogs tore him apart. The lady knew that was my pig. I was so angry!! He would do tricks for popcorn. He would sleep at the edge of the couch while I was watching tv or such and such. One night, he came into my room squealing and huffing. I looked down and he wanted to get into bed with me!! He was a baby at that time and I let him. He loved mud baths.


    Petunia was my love! She was pink. Or they actually call it white. She lived outside when she got bigger and lived with dogs and a goat. She actually thought she was a dog. The goat too. If the dogs ran across the yard after something there went Petunia and the goat. They are fun but need a lot of care and attention, just like Lynn said. They will love you. They are sweet.
     
  4. Frizzledhen

    Frizzledhen Spear Gunnin' Coons

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    Pot belly Pigs are a lot of fun. My daughter was given a baby and she took it home and house broke it to a littler pan and the kids just loved it. They can be really sweet. A while later her tiny cute little piggy turned into a 60# sow. So she turned to me, or the farm, and I inherited it. Since it was raised in the house it always wanted in but was not welcome. Pigs, even cute little pot bellies will destroy a lawn in no time. She was not happy being locked up so I found another farm for her to go to. They loved her very much but again found that their manicured lawn was totally torn up. They also tried to keep her confined. The last time I asked about her I was told that she made a mighty fine BBQ. One really need to do their research before getting a PBP.
    Gayle
    Chi lady in Michigan
     
  5. mdbucks

    mdbucks Cooped Up

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    I say just get a regular pig, by the time the newness has worn off, it should be ready for the freezer [​IMG]
     
  6. firechicken

    firechicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for all the comments! I am just considering all my options for being a little more self reliant with what little land (and $) I have. I wonder how much $ it would take to get a piggy to eating age and slaughtered.
    Surely it would be alot cheaper then going to the grocery store and buying 100 lbs. of pork!!

    mmmm bacon.
     
  7. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    We have had 3 different pbp's for pets and ended up rehoming them to little petting farms etc... due to size and aggressiveness. They can grow quite large as listed above and can tear up a LOT of stuff inside and out. I have been told theat they have too much fat on them to eat them but I don't know. Try your local horse/cattle/goat auction on the weekends because they usually run pigs through in between the goats and all and you can get a pig either as a baby or one ready to slaughter petty cheap right now. With all the dry weather there isn't much pasture and all for extra animals not earning their keep. The local meat processor near us quoted .60/lb for killing, cleaning, butchering and wrapping. Not bad considering all you have to do is take him up the road and then bring home all the meat already packaged. Think what you spend on a pound of bacon and a pound of sausage every week.
     
  8. Cheri

    Cheri Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:MEANIE!!! [​IMG]

    I do plan on getting some feeder hogs.
     
  9. firechicken

    firechicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If I were to get two feeder pigs and finish them, but only wanted to keep one for my family to eat and sell the other one, where would I sell it?
    I keep reading "at the market" does this mean the farmers market? Does it mean the live pig or a butchered pig?

    Just trying to get a little more specific information then what I can find on the net.
    Anyone with experience with this sorta thing?
    Thanks, Trevor
     
  10. mdbucks

    mdbucks Cooped Up

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    check the local paper for add to split hog/see if any are there, they are in our paper quite often, you will need to get with butcher, they should be able to give you a list of what to expect from a 1/2 or whole hog so when someone calls you wll be informed and can say these were raised local no hormones etc... you will get approx.... 20 lbs of bacon, 25 lbs of porkchops..... good luck

    Might also have bulitin board at feed store.
     

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