poultry netting w/horse charger ok?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Beagler1776, May 27, 2008.

  1. Beagler1776

    Beagler1776 New Egg

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    May 27, 2008
    Hi all,

    I have so many questions as a newbie chick owner. We have 15 layers and 11 meat, all about 5 wks old (and maybe guineas soon if I don't fink out)... Our coop is about 2/3 done, thanks to the great tips I've found here. Now we're working on the run and I have many more questions. I have been rigging temporary hardware cloth into a pen, but need a more permanent set up soon. Had hoped to use chain link w/tall posts but that's been delayed... DH is building this in his spare time (we have a large farm that keeps him busy) so I thought ordering netting would be a fast way to get a run up by myself, plus I could move it around a bit... There is not yet any power to coop. Have used extension cords during brooding. Horse fence is very close though so it'd be easy to link it too poultry netting IF it's safe...

    Can I link it to our electrobraid horse fencing that's powered by a 6 joule charger?
    Will that be too much for chickens or fence material?
    What should I be extra careful about?
    Wings are not yet clipped - will I need deer netting over top right now?
    I'm sorry my brain's not better organized right now to ask ALL my questions. I'll be back soon w/more no doubt! ;-)
    TIA
    Leslie
    3 RIR 3 Buff O, 3 Barred Rock, 3 gold Wyandotts, 3 EEs,
     
  2. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:The netting draws a lot of current, since unless stretched perfectly it's grounding out in lots of places. I can't imagine a charger being 'too strong', especially when running through the netting. I guess I would put your tester on it and if what was over 8.0 kV then maybe you' have problems. Otherise I wouldn't worry too much.

    I have high tensile on my pastures, so I runt he poultry netting within range of those then just alligator clip into it wherever I want to put the layers. It makes rotation very easy. I'm laying polypipe around now, too, which means I won't have to do as much hose tugging.


    Quote:That doesn't seem too strong given the nature of the netting.

    Quote:No.

    Quote:The netting will tend to sag and draw a lot of current, especially during the flush. If anything I worry about my netting causing my whole system to be too weak!

    Quote:No. After they get their first shock, they will not be inclined to go near the fence let along fly out.
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Depends in large part how *much* horse fencing you have on the charger already (including total length of electrified materials, brand of braid, how good your connections are, other sources of 'lost' charge, etc). If you've got like 5k volts (measured ACCURATELY with one of the more expensive, digital type meters, not the cheesy neon light thingies that are typically pretty inaccurate) and only want to put one length of electronet on, I bet you'd be fine. But if the horse fence is already 'challenging' the charger, then quite possibly not.

    If you are thinking of buying your electronet from Premier, who btw I =highly= recommend both for quality, reasonable price given the quality, and excellent customer service... why not just call them up and see what they think. They will ask you how much electrobraid you're already running so make sure you've calculated it out in advance [​IMG]

    Good luck,

    Pat
     
  4. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Washington State
    I buy pretty much everything from Premier. You pay more, but it's solid stuff which will last forever. Over a life cycle, it's better to buy something from them than the feed store which you may have to replace or may be of dubious quality.
     
  5. Beagler1776

    Beagler1776 New Egg

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    May 27, 2008
    Wow everyone, THANKS for the fast and helpful answers.
    I'm pretty sure my charger can handle the load but will try to pick up a better fence tester to confirm. I asked Premiere and they said a weed chopper function would be too much but otherwise 6joule was fine for the fencing. (They too were fast in response to my email earlier.) Now I'm questioning my rush decision to order what I found on Ebay... Hope its good enough quality. I was just looking for something fast n easy (love Paypal!) and it seemed similar to McMurray's... Didn't find your recommendation in time - dumb me rushing too much as usual.
    Below is the Ebay description (cost about $150). Any feedback is appreciated. If it doesn't work out for chickens, I keep saying I want a dairy goat soooo.... ;-)

    Brand new Electro-Web electric netting, Ideal for Goats, sheep and poultry. available in White, Orange,or Green color, ask about volume discounts.


    A very convenient form of all-purpose, portable electric fencing that is quick and easy to set up. Great for keeping in all types of animals from rabbits to dogs, or is also a perfect barrier for protecting gardens, flower beds, newly planted areas, etc. from dogs, cats, raccoons or other unwanted pests. The horizontal strands contain durable, stainless steel wire for reliable conductivity woven with polyethylene for strength and durability. The vertical and bottom strands are without wire to prevent the fence from shorting out. The cross-joints are secured by a non-slip, molded plastic button for strength. Convenient snap clips group the conductors together at each end of the net to join additional nets or attach the fence charger.

    This Net has 3 inch vertical strand spacing apart and graduates 12 horizontal strands up from 2.5 inches to 4.48 inches apart so goats wont get heads into them.

    Comes complete with 42” x 165’ netting, posts, anchor stakes, corner stakes, junction clips, repair kit and installation instructions.

    Also check out www.patriotchargers.com for advice and fun stuff
     

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