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Poultry Scratch

Discussion in 'Nutrition - Sponsored by Purina Poultry' started by jessarndt, Mar 6, 2015.

  1. jessarndt

    jessarndt Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2015
    I have 4 laying hens.. I was told they only need "Scratch feed" so I have that in a feeder and since they stay in the coop I spread it across the floor of the coop a couple times a day.. "I read that they should never be bored." I gave them carrots yesterday, as a treat. Earlier I took fried egg shells because I was reading about the eggs and oyster shells on here. I just want my babe's to be happy and well fed. Do they need anything else to eat/do?? This is my first flock ever, by the way! Any info is very much appreciated!!
     
  2. JJSS89

    JJSS89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What is the protein on the "scratch"?

    Most scratch is a treat and shouldn't be the main course because it is high in fat and low in protein.
     
  3. jessarndt

    jessarndt Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2015
    It's Scratch Grains
     
  4. JJSS89

    JJSS89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    E Washington
    Somewhere on the bag it should list the protein percentage. See the other thread [​IMG]
     
  5. jessarndt

    jessarndt Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay, thank you.. Yea someone else is telling me that on my post about where I thought I have a "bully" she's probably just hungry. We are going right now to get layer feed.
     
  6. DaveOmak

    DaveOmak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 18, 2013
    Omak, Washington
    My Coop
    How old are the hens..... If less than 18 weeks, feed all flock feed at 20% protein... if 18 weeks or older, feed laying feed at ~16% protein and oyster shells.....

    All chickens should have granite grit to free feed on...
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. DrMikelleRoeder

    DrMikelleRoeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Assuming that your birds are layers, they should be fed a complete layer feed. Complete layer feeds provide all of the nutrients happy, healthy chickens need to produce high quality eggs. Specifically, layer feeds contain the added calcium that adult birds need for strong egg shells. Without adequate dietary calcium, birds may rob their bones of calcium in order to make egg shells, setting them up for osteoporosis (yes, hens can get that!). In addition, the fortified layer feed has the amino acids, vitamins and minerals needed for optimal health and production, nutrients the unfortified scratch grains do not supply in anywhere near adequate amounts. Scratch grains are a great treat, but they should not be fed as a sole ration. We recommend that flock raisers follow the 90/10 rule when it comes to a balanced diet. This means that 90% of the diet should consist of a complete later feed, leaving 10% of the diet for additional treats/scraps/supplements. We do not recommend feeding egg shells – we never want the hens to get the idea that eating eggs is a good thing, as that can encourage the development of egg-eating behavior, where hens actually learn to break eggs and eat them. If your goal is to have fresh eggs for your family, you don’t want the hens eating them first! Once this behavior becomes endemic in a flock, you really cannot stop it. If you are worried about your chickens being bored, you might try supplying them with toys to help keep them busy – balls, large rubber snakes or insects (too large to be swallowed), and other safe items that will give them something to do, especially during the winter when they must be confined. Providing a dust bath is also a wonderful treat for them. A large pan full of several inches of peat moss will have them rolling and dusting themselves with great enjoyment. It’s a very natural activity that gives them pleasure. If you are interested in learning more, we have several articles on our website on raising happy, healthy backyard flocks. Check them out sometime when you get a chance! http://purinamills.com/animal-nutrition-information/?cat=Backyard Poultry Good luck and have FUN with your new flock!
     
    1 person likes this.

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