1. Lady Nilstria

    Lady Nilstria Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 12, 2009
    Soooo...I've read up on fowl pox, but on every webpage I've read, they neglect to inform me about if the virus can be transmitted to humans (IE eggs or meat) and if it's potentially dangerous or not.

    I've been getting my chicks from people whom I will not get again, and some of my white rocks and RIRs have just a few of those little black scabby things. Should I stop eating their eggs?
     
  2. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 15, 2009
    Northern California
    There are no human health risks with pox. The virus that causes Pox is completely different than the virus that causes human ChickenPox. The eggs may be of lesser quality though.
     
  3. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Lady, this time of year those scaby things are not likely to be pox. Pox is transmitted by mosquitoes and they are dormant in most places at this time. Warmer months are when you may experience pox.
     
  4. Lady Nilstria

    Lady Nilstria Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 12, 2009
    We've had 75 degree weather here. [​IMG] Actually, today it's going up to 78. (And some of our neighbors leave standing water about.)

    That's a relief though. Last night I came across an egg that looked like that of a reptile. O_O The shell was very soft. That's what made me concerned about the pox and potential health risks. I've got to get me some oyster shell.
     
  5. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 15, 2009
    Northern California
    The soft shell might be caused by something worse than a lack of calcium. Watch your birds carefully, and add electrolytes to their water. If soft shells persist, it's likely something worse.
     
  6. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    So your layer feed does not contain ground oyster? You know, those scabs might also be caused by stress to the layers due to missing calcium. Layer should have access to oyster shell at all times. That also accounts for the weak-shelled egg.
     
  7. Lady Nilstria

    Lady Nilstria Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 12, 2009
    Yeah, I went and got some oyster shell today, and gave it to them, so I hope everything works out properly.

    14 hens laid 14 eggs yesterday, with one of those being the 'reptile' egg, and another having calcified material on it, so, that makes 12 good eggs. I candled all of theml minus the reptile; none had any hairline cracks (some had in days past), though the shell looked just the tiniest bit blotchy. Would a thin shell do that?

    (I used to have the chart for egg defects and stuff, but I lost the link. <_<)
     

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