Pressure canning pork sausage...???

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by Intheswamp, Sep 13, 2016.

  1. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, I'm thinking about pressure canning some link pork sausage. I understand that sage can make it bitter so I'll check out the ingredients first. The NCHFP at the University of Georgia lists the standard brown and can at 10 pounds for 75min/pint or 90min/quart. It also states to top off with hot broth or boiling water leaving one inch of head space. Do you have to add the liquid to the sausage? I understand the reason for little air space in the jar but if you pack the sausage in snuggly leaving little room, will the sausage create enough juices to fill the voids?

    Any tips on canning link sausage out there? :)

    Thanks!!!
    Ed
     
  2. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello? Anybody there? :)
     
  3. wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here is my guess: I wonder if the liquid is too facilitate the transfer of heat so they process correctly and will also keep them moist in the jar until you want to use them. Since you brown them first, there may not be enough liquid left to fill the jar, and you don't really want to leave too much grease in them because fat can go bad canned. All the meat canning recipes I have read say to use lean meat and cut off all visible fat.
     
  4. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the feedback, wyoDreamer. From what I understand, one of the reasons for filling the voids with a liquid is to reduce the amount of air needed to be expelled to help create the best vacuum seal possible. It seems that the more air voids that their are in the jar the less of a vacuum is created. Thus, the recommendations for specific head spaces for different foods. At least that's my take on it, but remember that I'm a very, very rank newbie at canning having only canned a whopping six quarts of meat so far. :)

    Ed
     
  5. Maeschak

    Maeschak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a canning question if anyone knows the answer, I would greatly appreciate it-

    I made a spicy sauce from 1.5 red onions, about 15 cloves of garlic, 2-3 TB of salt, juice from 3 limes, and a whole bunch of Thai ornamental chilis. (I blended together with food processor). I water bath canned it for 10 minutes but now I am wondering if I should have pressure canned it instead. If I should have pressure canned it, can I put all the finished water bath canned jars back into the canner and pressure can them? I did these yesterday morning.

    If anyone has any insight I would really appreciate it. I love the flavor and dont want to lose all the hard work.

    Thanks!
     
  6. Nineplus5

    Nineplus5 Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote: Yum!


    Mostly depends on acidity I think. I'm looking in my Ball canning book and the recipe for salsa calls for a water bath canning. You can ook at the Ball book on-line. Ball Bluebook.

    I did a cayenne pepper jelly last year that I based on the jalepeno jelly in the book and it was awesome. Made too much for just me though.
     
  7. Maeschak

    Maeschak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah, I was too worried about it so I just chucked most of it and kept two cans in the fridge. It is delicious! Luckily I have another batch of little thai chilis so I will make more and pressure can this time. Got a few Jalapenos that might not turn red before the frost so I might just try some pepper jelly! (I dry and smoke the red ones in my smoker to make chipotle).
     

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