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Pressure treated wood.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by jbrianchamberli, Apr 19, 2017.

  1. jbrianchamberli

    jbrianchamberli Out Of The Brooder

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    I think I'm screwed. I bought 30 pressure treated 2x4's, premium quality to start my coop. The wood is pretty wet so there will be no staining or painting. Anyone see an issue with leaving it as is for a couple of months, removing the wire and then staining or painting it later?


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  2. blackdog043

    blackdog043 Out Of The Brooder

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    Except for the extra work of removing and reattaching your wire, there is no problem. I would let it dry out for six months before doing anything.
     
  3. jbrianchamberli

    jbrianchamberli Out Of The Brooder

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    Think it's really my only option at this point. Can't paint or stain wood that isn't dry. Guess I just wanted to see someone else write the same thing.


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  4. MrsKris

    MrsKris Just Hatched

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    Just a thought...My husband works for a company that builds Amish style storage type buildings... They use new treated lumber, not dry, and use Sherwin Williams stain and/or paint on all of them. I've seen some of the buildings years after being stained and they look great. I can get the exact name if you are interested...
     
  5. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Actually, there might be two issues. One is the stain, but since most stains these days are now water based, that may not matter. It seems to me there are two versions of these stains, however. Some is mostly transparent and tints the wood certain colors, but you can still see the grain. The other is thicker and is intended to function like paint. I'd think the transparent would work better on the wet treated stuff.

    Second issue is this wood may shrink, warp, twist and otherwise change shape some as it starts to dry. This may not matter on a chicken house. The stained stuff may change color some as the wood dries out.

    Some are concerned about the wood being treated. As long as you are using the new stuff (tag on it probably says MCA somewhere), I would use it. MCA stands for Micronized Copper Azole. Copper dust is the preservative and it has been ground to microscopic sizes, put into suspension in a liquid and injected into the wood under pressure. The Azole is a fungicide.

    These replace what was thought to be a more toxic treatment called CCA, with the A in this one standing for Arsenic, a poison. Not much, but some and enough the government decided it wasn't worth the health risk of people walking around in bare feet on decks made of the stuff. I would not worry about buying CCA. It is no longer available to mere mortals at the box stores. You have to find that stuff in special yards that sell to farmers for fence posts and pole barn builders and some commercial / industrial uses.
     
  6. ChickityChina

    ChickityChina Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This made me LOL at work. [​IMG] Good info though.
     
  7. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

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    Some of us old fogies remember creosote fondly! Toxic, sure, but it was the best! Mary
     
  8. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes......I can show you some split posts my dad buried in the ground for a decorative yard fence that were treated with creosote. The boards for the fence were swamp cypress. It is still standing 60 years later. I also have decorative fence by my driveway, installed by the previous owner about 15 years ago. It uses the new treated stuff and the posts have all rotted off at the ground and all needs to be replaced. I'm in the hunt for some of the good old stuff to replace them with. I'll probably have to lie and tell them I'm a farmer.......or know a farmer.......or used to be a farmer.......or someday hope to once again be a farmer........and maybe they will cast a blind eye to any "Imperial Entanglements" and sell me a few good posts. Or else try to find a few straight hedge posts and use those.
     
  9. ScottandSam

    ScottandSam Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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