preventing coccidosis?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by speckledegg, Jun 11, 2011.

  1. speckledegg

    speckledegg Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 2, 2011
    W. WA
    We are getting our 3 baby chicks tomorrow and I'm so afraid I'm going to kill the little gals. I'm reading so many stories of little chickies dying! I am planning on feeding organic starter and the person I'm getting them from recommends raw milk if they start getting ill for the beneficial bacteria. I'm also reading that medicated starter doesn't always prevent cocci. Is this true? What is the best form of protection against preventing cocci besides keeping everything clean? Should I give an occasional low does of sulmet? I already have sav a chick that I plan to use the first couple days. Should I do medicated starter and save the organic for later? Thanks!
     
  2. tclegg

    tclegg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2011
    Parkersburg
    It is usually preference--but I would say most would hold off on organic and use medicated chicken starter..I did and the chicken "experts" meaning ones that have raised chickens for years and got me started recommend that it is worth the extra assurance to use. Also Save A Chick--electrolyte like you mentioned is good to use..Coccidosis is just something found in soil and is can be fatal--usually if one chick gets it-it can spread rapidly..IMO I would take the extra step and go medicated first...but you will prob have other BYC's coming on soon to give opinions both ways but those are mine...And my chicks (13) are wonderfully healthy and thriving with no problems--whatsoever (knock on wood)...Oh except their all spoiled....LOL
     
  3. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    It's true that even medicated starter does not necessarily prevent coccidiosis. Medicated is all I can find here and mine usually get a bout of cocci; it's really quite common in the moist, warm south. It doesn't really spread chick to chick, but each one can become overwhelmed by the oocysts in the soil, then they drink water with poop in it that contains those oocycsts, etc. You just watch for the signs and get some Corid (which is concentrated amprolium) to treat with if you see them. If you want to do organic feed, that's fine. Just feed them whatever you want and watch for the signs of cocci and use your Corid. I keep it on hand all the time for when I have chicks.

    Raw milk is an old remedy, yes. Also, replacing some of the starter crumble with nonfat dry milk is another. Giving plain yogurt on occasion helps beneficial gut flora as well.

    I would not give Sulmet occasionally as a preventative, no. It's hard on their gut, being a sulfa drug. In fact, I'd avoid it altogether in favor of Corid, which is a thiamine blocker and much easier on their intestines, and only give it if you see bloody poop or they seem puffed up or lethargic.
     
  4. speckledegg

    speckledegg Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 2, 2011
    W. WA
    ok, thank you! I will get some medicated starter and have some corid on hand. If they get it, I'm assuming it's after they've spend some time outside?
     
  5. gale65

    gale65 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Can you tell me what ratio you use the corid at (in the water, I'm guessing?). I have some but it isn't in the original pkg. I got it from a vet and they buy it in big containers so they put some in a water bottle for me. I originally got it for our rabbits and I think I used 1 tsp per gallon for them.
     
  6. tclegg

    tclegg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2011
    Parkersburg
    Quote:That's what I meant when I said chick to chick--sorry to confuse--with my wording..passed along thru water/feed contaiminates. Hope all is well...
     
  7. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    With small chicks, I usually do a teaspoon of liquid 9.6% solution Corid to a gallon of water, changed daily, but if they are older or I think it's critical and they are looking bad, I do 2 teaspoons in a gallon. I've never lost one chick to cocci. It's very treatable if you catch it in time.


    Most of the time, they get it if they've spent time outside, however, they can get cocci in the brooder. Apparently, the oocysts are in their gut. I know someone who lost an entire hatch in the brooder to a virulent strain of cocci (there are 9 types) and they'd never touched the ground. There was a necropsy done so we know it to be true.

    I put some dirt from outside in the brooder from the time they're a couple of days old so they get exposure to the soil from the start. My chicks with broody mamas that are on soil from their first week of life never get coccidiosis, probably because they peck at her poop (she's already immune) and they get tiny doses of the oocysts from the get-go.
     
  8. eggcamefirst

    eggcamefirst Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 14, 2010
    Piedmont Triad, NC
    Where can you buy Corid?
     
  9. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Feed stores should have it. If not there, Revival Animal Health online has it for a good price.
     
  10. eggcamefirst

    eggcamefirst Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 14, 2010
    Piedmont Triad, NC
    On the website it says its used for treating coccidia in cattle? Is that the same stuff?
     

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