Preventing Respiratory Disease

Apr 13, 2021
86
277
91
Bakersfield, California
Hi everyone, I recently lost my favorite roo to a respiratory illness.
I don't know which bacteria caused it, but I want to prevent my other chickens from getting it. Any idea of causes and ways to stop it from infecting the rest of my flock?
 

Raeganmh02

Chirping
Jan 26, 2020
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Wait it out and see if any of the others come down with symptoms. You can always pay a little money to get them tested if you can narrow down what you think it is. I lost my flock to Infectious Coryza...I honestly regret culling my flock. I thought It was the best thing but now when I think back I kick myself for it. I tested mine specifically for that disease and it was $60 in Indiana. I could have dosed them with Oxytetracycline powder and they would have survived it. Oxytetracycline powder is commonly used to treat respiratory diseases in chickens. It does not kill the disease completely but it helps get them through it. Best of luck!
 

Wyorp Rock

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Sep 20, 2015
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Hi everyone, I recently lost my favorite roo to a respiratory illness.
I don't know which bacteria caused it, but I want to prevent my other chickens from getting it. Any idea of causes and ways to stop it from infecting the rest of my flock?
I'm sorry about your rooster.
Without testing, we have no way of knowing what he had.

How long had you had him? Was he new to your flock?

All respiratory diseases are contagious, so if he was with your flock, then they were exposed. The best thing you can do is observe your flock(s) for any symptoms that may appear.
Treating prophylactically is not practical since you don't know what to treat for.

There is no "cures" for respiratory diseases, just treatment/supportive care for Symptoms.
Symptoms of respiratory disease like MG is usually treated with Tylosin, while symptoms of Infectious Coryza are treated with Sulfa antibiotics.
Here's good information about some common poultry diseases https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/ps044

IF You have any birds show symptoms of respiratory disease, then getting testing through your state lab or through an independent lab like Zoologix would be a good idea, this way you know what you are dealing with and know how to proceed with treating symptoms.
 

dawg53

Humble
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Nov 27, 2008
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Wait it out and see if any of the others come down with symptoms. You can always pay a little money to get them tested if you can narrow down what you think it is. I lost my flock to Infectious Coryza...I honestly regret culling my flock. I thought It was the best thing but now when I think back I kick myself for it. I tested mine specifically for that disease and it was $60 in Indiana. I could have dosed them with Oxytetracycline powder and they would have survived it. Oxytetracycline powder is commonly used to treat respiratory diseases in chickens. It does not kill the disease completely but it helps get them through it. Best of luck
You did the right thing by culling your Infectious Coryza infected flock. Dont second guess yourself. Key word: INFECTIOUS.
If you hadnt culled your flock, you still would be spending money treating sick birds that will remain carriers for the rest of their lives. Sick birds dont lay eggs and sick birds rarely or dont drink water, medicated or not. Then you have withdrawal periods after using antibiotics even IF they did lay eggs. Then eventual antibiotic resistance to deal with when birds become stressed. The disease itself is a stressor.
Oxytetracycline powder doesnt completely treat Coryza. A sulfa drug must be given in combination with an antibiotic such as oxytetracycline in order to treat Coryza. TREAT, not CURE.

Disinfect everything including inside the coop, waterers and feeders, roosts and wait about 6 months. Then repopulate with new birds. It's best to order chicks from a reputable hatchery and repopulate.
 
Apr 13, 2021
86
277
91
Bakersfield, California
I'm sorry about your rooster.
Without testing, we have no way of knowing what he had.

How long had you had him? Was he new to your flock?

All respiratory diseases are contagious, so if he was with your flock, then they were exposed. The best thing you can do is observe your flock(s) for any symptoms that may appear.
Treating prophylactically is not practical since you don't know what to treat for.

There is no "cures" for respiratory diseases, just treatment/supportive care for Symptoms.
Symptoms of respiratory disease like MG is usually treated with Tylosin, while symptoms of Infectious Coryza are treated with Sulfa antibiotics.
Here's good information about some common poultry diseases https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/ps044

IF You have any birds show symptoms of respiratory disease, then getting testing through your state lab or through an independent lab like Zoologix would be a good idea, this way you know what you are dealing with and know how to proceed with treating symptoms.
I have had him for about a week and a half. He was still being introduced when it started being life-threatening.
 

humblehillsfarm

Crazy chicken lady
Mar 27, 2020
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I have had him for about a week and a half. He was still being introduced when it started being life-threatening.
Oh dear. Well let this be a lesson learned on the importance of quarantine with true biosecurity. As keeping new birds far away from the flock, washing your hands after handling quarantined birds, changing shoes, etc.. Moving to a new home is stressful and often triggers suppressed diseases and virus. Most often respiratory illness are viral first with bacterial infections occurring secondary. If any other birds become sick, I strongly suggest a necropsy. In the mean time, no new birds into your flock and definitely no birds OUT of the flock, unless you want to be responsible for introducing a disease to someone else's flock.
 

Wyorp Rock

🐓 ❤ 🐛
Premium Feather Member
6 Years
Sep 20, 2015
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All you can do is watch your flock to see if they develop symptoms. If they do, then have some testing done.

Was he sneezing when you got him or did that start a few days after he was near your existing flock. The transmission of disease can work both ways....
 

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