Proactive health care measures for new chicks?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by pathwandering, Aug 10, 2014.

  1. pathwandering

    pathwandering Out Of The Brooder

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    I posted this in the quarantine thread but then thought that perhaps it belongs here. Apologies if I am getting it wrong...

    I am quarantining two 8 week old chicks I got today. I examined them for a good amount of time and couldn't see any lice or mites - vents, eyes, noses, legs all look good BUT they were in a large free range flock and were at the bottom of the pecking order and that shows a little. Not a lot, but they aren't in the pristine condition that my other birds were when I got them. Some pecked tail feathers and smaller than what I think they should probably be at this age. (They were just so friendly to my daughter...and I think they will eventually be very pretty birds)
    They are being quarantined in an area my chickens never go, I'm terrible at distances but I would guess 30-40 feet from their coop? I could move them further but that would put them into the deep woods where they would be more likely to be attacked and I can't keep as good an eye on them.

    Beyond keeping them quarantined and practicing biosecurity, I'm wondering what I should do proactively for their health - should I give them a DE bath? front-line? de-worm them? I don't want to stress them out but it seems like some of these things would be wise. I'm just not sure how to do it for this age.
     
  2. Stiggy

    Stiggy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    De worming is a good idea, just to cover the basics, and a lice powdering never hurts ( just keep it away form their face) .
    If they are looking small then you will need to feed them up on some growers with some extra protein/ calcium. When fattening up smaller birds I use wild bird seed and meat scraps or a small slice of dog roll. Keeping them at a safe distance is a good idea to start with
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Quality nutrition, possibly a little high on protein side, good water, avoid stress and simply keep an eye out for problems. I do not treat for disease or parasites unless signs of such are evident.
     
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  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Get some Corid and keep it on hand. Whenever you bring in new birds the potential is there for them to bring along a strain of cocci that your older birds are not immune to and an outbreak is possible. Your new youngsters can also pick up something new to them when you do finally integrate them to your flock. Just keep a close eye out for early signs and treat if needed.
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Both great suggestions^^^^

    .....especially agree with not treating for something unless you know for sure it's there, it just adds stress to an already stressful situation.

    Give them a couple weeks to eat up, settle in and just observe them closely for any problems. At only 8 weeks old they still have some molting and growing in of some beautiful new feathers.

    Enjoy watching them blossom in their nice new environment. Kudos on the bio quarantine!!
     
  6. pathwandering

    pathwandering Out Of The Brooder

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    May 19, 2014
    Thanks for the advice! I just hope I haven't made a mistake...or rather, I'm pretty sure I did make a mistake, but I hope I can turn it around.
    Their droppings were dark brown yesterday, fairly normal looking (just darker than what I'm used to) and today their droppings are very loose, light brown, watery. I don't know if what I saw is worms, but it certainly looked like it could have been. Could the change be just due to the change in location, stress and diet? I would say these chicks are not used to being able to eat all they want. They are ravenous. I offered them yogurt and they didn't seem to know it was food - I couldn't get them to try it.
    For now I'm keeping them enclosed in the dog crate and they seem ok with that for now. I'm building them a little portable tractor so I can allow them to forage in an area my chickens never go. My neighbor let me put them on her driveway, so they are about 100 feet from my coop, and 20-30 feet from the furthest my chickens venture out when free ranging.
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Many different 'normal' kind of poops...and yes stress and diet can change them.

    Here's a good article on what they look like....might ease your mind.
     
  8. snoopysflock

    snoopysflock Out Of The Brooder

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    they look fine a lot of chickens change poops because of stress and separation but a loose watery poop can mean worms a de bath can never hurt. try putting a little de in their water that is safe and will worm them as well
     
  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Food Grade DE will not kill worms, it doesn't do anything when wet....but it can help control insects when used dry.

    Loose watery poop an also be from an increase of water consumption during hot weather.
     
  10. snoopysflock

    snoopysflock Out Of The Brooder

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    if they ingest it wen wet it will move through the gi and kill worms that is proven they use it on children in africa look it up online i have used on my chickens for years and no worm problems
     

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