PROBIOTICS for you and your chickens

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by joebryant, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    WHAT ARE PROBIOTICS?
    http://www.jonbarron.org/detoxing-health-program/05-01-1999.php?gclid=COz41uzZ-KUCFQTNKgodFQoIpA

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    KEFIR http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/Makekefir.html
    Watch all ten of this guy's presentations: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MELveoRjK8M

    BUTTERMILK Mine love it, and its lactic acid and bacteria culture is super healthy for them and YOU.
    I make it a gallon at a time:
    Buy a quart of buttermilk, pour it into a large container with a gallon of milk. Let the five quarts sit at room temperature for 24 hours, stirring occasionally, and you'll have five quarts. Save a quart to use with another gallon of milk later.
    BTW, buttermilk will keep for a very long time in the refrigerator.
    Store in a glass container(s).

    YOGURT MAKE INEXPENSIVE YOGURT THE EASY WAY
    (based on directions from “Miss Prissy” on the Backyard Chickens forum)
    by
    Joe D. Bryant
    You will need:
    A small plastic, insulated cooler that will hold:
    4 one-quart jars/lids for yogurt/milk OR 2 half-gallon jars/lids for yogurt milk
    2 more quart jars to be filled with boiling water
    A very large pan to first boil water and then heat milk to 185* F.

    Ingredients:
    One gallon of milk (1% to 4%)
    One cup (or two heaping tablespoonsful per quart if not making a whole gallon) of PLAIN yogurt with live culture… no flavor… no fruit… Stonyfield Farms Organic plain yogurt OR Traders Point Creamery plain yogurt are both excellent and are sold by Marsh and other large chain stores for $5 quart.

    I used an Igloo 26-quart cooler that K-Mart sells for about $20.

    After the large pan of water is boiling, dip all the jars/lids in for several seconds to sterilize everything.

    Pour the large pan of boiling water into the cooler and into two quart jars. Put the lids on the jars loosely. Close the cooler’s lid with the two jars filled and the rest of the boiling water in the bottom of the cooler.

    Set the cooler aside to heat up and proceed to make the yogurt:

    After cooling the large pan, use it again to heat one gallon of milk to 185 degrees (I used Anne's meat thermometer because I couldn't find a "candy" thermometer in two stores). Place the hot milk pan in a sink filled with ice water and let it cool to 115 degrees (took about five minutes with ice on outside of pan). Stir in one cup of plain yogurt into the 115* F milk. After mixing well, pour the milk into the four sterilized one-quart glass jars or two half-gallon jars and put on the lids (not tight).

    Go back to the cooler, set the two quarts of hot water aside for a moment and empty the hot water out of the bottom of the cooler. Set the jars of warm milk/yogurt mix into the cooler with the two jars of boiling water and close the lid.
    After ten to twelve hours, take out the bottles of milk (finished yogurt) and put them in the refrigerator to cool.

    That’s it:
    For the cost of a gallon of milk, you have four quarts of yogurt that are identical to the cup of expensive plain yogurt that you bought. Save a cup of your new yogurt to make another gallon when this one is gone.

    KOMBUCHA Making Kombucha (one gallon)

    You will need:
    One scoby (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast)
    One cup of starter (already made kombucha)
    One gallon of boiling water
    Seven Black tea teabags
    Two cups of sugar

    Bring one gallon of water to a boil and then turn it off.
    Add two cups of sugar and seven black tea teabags to the very hot water.
    Let the hot water with sugar and tea bags sit until the water cools.
    Remove the tea bags from the cooled water.

    Have the scoby and a cup of starter in the bottom of a very-wide-mouth glass container. The opening of the container should be wider than the depth of the liquid in it. The process needs the surface area for air/breathing.
    Pour the cooled water into the glass container with the scoby and one cup of starter.
    Cover the glass container with a cloth, not a glass lid; the mixture has to breathe.


    After seven days remove the new (baby) scoby from the top of the old one (mother). Last week’s scoby (the mother) can be give to somebody else as a starter or thrown away. Note: If a new scoby (baby) looks underdeveloped, keep old (mother) and new (baby) together for another week before you separate them.
    Strain your fresh kombucha into a glass container(s) and refrigerate. Use one cup of the fresh kombucha (starter) and the baby scoby (to be a new mother) to make a new batch for next week.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2010
  2. ChickenCat

    ChickenCat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 1, 2009
    craig county, VA
    Very nice! Thank you and my "girls" thank you too. [​IMG] They will enjoy the yougurt and buttermilk.
     
  3. emarble

    emarble Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:"KEFIR" is actually quicker and easier than the others and if you get good grains they will multiply even quicker than the you tube guys videos I got mine from here and they have already almost doubled and are producing a full quart a day http://www.kefirlady.com/orderkefirgrains.htm



    Easy
    to make you need fresh whole milk and kefir grains 1/4 cup of kefir grains and 1 quart of whole milk let it set on the counter overnight covered with a cloth/ stir after 24 hours and strain

    ernie
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2010
  4. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:"KEFIR" is actually quicker and easier than the others and if you get good grains they will multiply even quicker than the you tube guys videos I got mine from here and they have already almost doubled and are producing a full quart a day http://www.kefirlady.com/orderkefirgrains.htm



    Easy
    to make you need fresh whole milk and kefir grains 1/4 cup of kefir grains and 1 quart of whole milk let it set on the counter overnight covered with a cloth/ stir after 24 hours and strain

    ernie

    Ernie, I agree. Kefir is best by far. Not only does it have 42 probiotics (Yogurt has two.) in the forms of good bacterias and yeasts, it's the easiest to work with. I use two two-gallon glass jars with glass tops from Walmart. I add a quart or two of milk per day, so I only have to strain it once a week into the other two-gallon jar that goes into the refrigerator; then I wash the first one, dump the grains from the plastic colander back into it, add a quart of milk that's just barely warmed in the microwave, cover with a paper sack, and add a quart a day for seven more days. So that's more than a gallon a week for my wife, my chickens, my dogs, and me. I could make a gallon a day now if I wanted to, but... [​IMG]
    I've only had mine for a few weeks, and they've multiplied quite a bit. There are some members whom I'll be sending some free grains when I get back from Florida.

    ETA Anne and I can already see a BIG difference in our digestion systems, sleep, and energy. The stuff is really something. EVERYONE should be drinking it. It's like yogurt on steroids.
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2010
    1 person likes this.
  5. clairabean

    clairabean Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 7, 2010
    Kootenays of BC!
    How much do you feed your chickens? Daily?
    I am trying your buttermilk recipe. The humans in our house don't care for buttermilk. And kefir...Mmmm.... next on my list to make.
     
  6. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Oct 19, 2009
    Forks, WA
    Nice that you started this thread. [​IMG]

    I miss growing Kefir. [​IMG] Our goats won't be producing until May, so. . . I guess I'll just go without until then. Can't stand the thought of growing it on storebought cow milk. [​IMG]
     
  7. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I give my nine bbs Orpingtons, eleven Orpington chicks, and six silkies, about a quart a week over other foods such as sprouts and/or birdseed. I don't have a schedule because I'm just starting with kefir.
     
  8. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wisconsin Northwoods
    Quote:Joe,
    What are you observing with your flock being fed living foods and a diet high in Probiotics.?

    I have completely made the switch. I feed little feed (containing ingredients that have been processed), lots of probiotics and living foods, no chemical wormers, no "routine" antibotics. Chicks raised on living food also no medicated starters.

    Maybe it is just the ole "proud parent syndrome" but sure seems like I have super chickens!... I give birds away and they win shows. Feathers are very healthy, birds are healthy, my birds seem to start laying quicker than others, they seem to molt faster and recover faster than others. Poop is very low odor and solid. Eggs even in winter have a better than average home flock taste.


    ON
     
  9. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 30, 2009
    Wisconsin Northwoods
    On yogurt:
    BYC's MISSPRISSY, has a detailed yogurt making procedure here on BYC. (Same as your method.) I have been using it for quite some time. We make two gallons of yogurt every two weeks.
    Play around with starter cultures, we found a blend of two different cultures suites are liking. When making a batch of yogurt, I always throw a part of a jar in the freezer as the starter for the next batch..[​IMG]

    We strain ours for a thick greek style. I have found that if you are gentle a colander works fine, that way we do not need to futz around with cheese cloth..[​IMG]

    I put 9 quart jars of yogurt in my cooler, a little hot water on the bottom of the cooler with the jars held above the water. I throw a nice warm down comforter over the cooler to hold the temp.

    ON
     
  10. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:Mine is just a rewrite of Miss Prissy's method for my own use. I said that in my preface above "(based on directions from “Miss Prissy” on the Backyard Chickens forum)."

    I doubt though that I will ever make yogurt or buttermilk again because health wise the kefir is so much better and easier to make.
     

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