Problem with waterfowl! (semi-urgent)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by AnserMater, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. AnserMater

    AnserMater Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 14, 2012
    Hello!

    I need some help regarding waterfowl. I've wanted to own ducks or goslings for a very long time, so I made the necessary arrangements to have some.

    A few weeks ago, I purchased a duckling. Very suddenly the duckling passed from what seemed to be a respiratory infection, or pneumonia. I was so sad, because I was really starting to fall in love. Well, I went to go get a gosling after cleaning the house thoroughly in case there was a potential bacteria that caused the duckling's death. Now I'm very worried that the gosling is going to suffer the same fate. He's been sneezing more frequently, and has watery stools. My chickens have been unaffected, and are thriving.

    I have penicillin but I'm at a loss. Does anyone have any advice? Is there anything I can do before it is too late?
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Apr 15, 2009
    Waterfowl tend to sneeze a lot because they constantly are flushing out their nostrils with water. They have a lot of water in their stools because they consume massive quantities of water. I don't see anything in your description of the bird that indicates a health concern.

    I definitely would not be using penicillin on the bird without knowing what you are treating. Penicillin is not the drug of choice when dealing with respiratory ailments.

    One thing that concerns me, though, is that you are getting single birds. Waterfowl are flock animals like chickens, but they are not chickens. They need their own kind around. They do not thrive unless there are at least 2 of them. I keep a single goose by circumstance, but she has 5 ducks to keep her company. I have often thought I should get her a friend, but she is old and ornery and used to being queen over her ducks, so I don't mess with the flock.

    You had a bad experience with an unthrifty duck, and I think that has worried you. I don't see any obvious reasons why you should be worried about your goose.

    Good luck. And sorry about losing the duckling.
     
  3. AnserMater

    AnserMater Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 14, 2012
    Thank you.

    I purchased one goose (and one duck for that matter) because I am expecting some more goslings soon from eggs I am hatching and I don't want to find myself suddenly owning more geese than I can handle. I don't go to work or school right now for personal and medical reasons, so I am taking advantage of this hiatus to rear waterfowl since they need so much attention.

    I have the penicillin for one of my hens who needed surgery, and I haven't used it on any babies... but it's sitting in my fridge in case it's needed again.

    The last two ducks I owned (years ago) did sneeze a lot from what I remember. I suppose I'm just extremely worried because the last little guy left me devastated. He must have just been unhealthy before I took him home. He was very small.

    I really appreciate your comforting words. I tend to worry too much sometimes.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2012
  4. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Apr 15, 2009
    Absolutely understandable. Try not to worry too much, though. You will just stress yourself needlessly. What is the saying?...Worry is interest paid on trouble not yet due. Flockwatcher has a variation of the saying as her signature. It is so apt when dealing with poultry. Keep an eye on the gosling, but remember that they are generally as tough as an old boot. S/he will likely be just fine.

    Good luck with your future endeavors.
     

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