Problems, Problems, problems

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by LazyGirl, Jul 18, 2008.

  1. LazyGirl

    LazyGirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Out of a batch of 23 cornish x's, 8 of them have leg problems!
    I am feeding them 18-20% protein, and their ration seems to have everything they would need.
    They are on fresh pasture daily (i move the coop).
    Bad Batch, or wrong feed, or something else???
    This is my first batch. They are now 7 weeks old, and 4 we've put down, and 4 more aren't able to move.
    Another Question is, can you still eat these birds? They seem so yucky, I just don't know. If they are able to still move to the feed, should I keep them, or get rid of them before they eat more $$.
    The ones that have probs also seem to have fewer feathers. What does this indicate? The rest seem very healthy, but these 4 did too last week...[​IMG]
     
  2. WisconsinChick

    WisconsinChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    cornish arent chickens and i wouldnt suggest buying them if you want to raise chickens.
     
  3. WrenAli

    WrenAli Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Because of their growth they are more likely to have leg issues. Sometimes it's genetics that cause the leg issues, in the case of my last batch. And sometimes it is feed. I try to keep mine on a feed that is at least 22% protein. It will help with the leg issues.

    Because they are on pasture they will get a lower protein diet while they graze. So, maintaining a higher protein feed source is crucial when pasturing these birds.

    How heavy are they? I butcher mine out between 7 and 8 weeks and they dress from 4 to 7 pounds. You can definitely eat the birds. They are not clean birds when comparing them to other birds. They are bred to eat and grow. If they can get to food I would leave them and butcher them out in another week or so. They don't get around to well in the last weeks. They start getting to heavy for their structure to support.

    The feathering is a result of growth. They grow so fast and put so much into meat that the feathers don't grow as well. So nothing to worry about there.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2008
  4. LazyGirl

    LazyGirl Out Of The Brooder

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    OK... That didn't really help me... (WI Chick)
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2008
  5. LazyGirl

    LazyGirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:Thanks.
    The ones that have leg probs have less feathers than the healthy ones. They must not be getting enought protein. That would make sense. I will add even more fish meal.
     
  6. bills

    bills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    vancouver island
    Lazy and Wren were posting and editing at the same time. [​IMG] lol

    I imagine that Lazy probably didn't see Wrens comments, before posting that last post, as I think wren had some good advice there. More protein, and go ahead and eat them, ugly or not, seems to be the answers Lazy was looking for.[​IMG]


    edit--oops, looks like I'm a slower typer then Lazy...[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2008
  7. WrenAli

    WrenAli Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is part of it. [​IMG]

    Fish meal? Good idea. I should see if I can find any cheap locally.

    Often, in the ones that I have that have leg problems I also notice a slightly slower growth all around. Not enough for me to really worry though. My smallest bird butchered out at 4.5 pounds at 8 weeks and the largest was just under 7.

    If only I could get uniform growth.
     
  8. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Quote:If they aren't chickens what are they? In all of your 12 year old wisdom please tell us what they are.

    A cornish cross is a white cornish rooster ove a white rock hen.

    LazyGirl, are you taking away their food at night or letting them eat all the time?
     
  9. LazyGirl

    LazyGirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Yep bills, that's exactly what happened! Wren had good comments
    MissPrissy, I am feeding them 24/7. If they are somewhat low on food at night, I won't refill it, but I make sure during the day they have food.
    I am getting feed from a local organic guy. It is really finely ground, and 18%. I add fish meal, but that too is powder. They eventually eat the powder (i don't give more until it's gone) but this means they are eating different ingredients at different times (i.e. if they eat as soon as i feed them, vs waiting when there is just powder)
     
  10. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    They are growing too fast and you are going to have more problems.

    Let them eat all they want all day long. Say from 7 am - 7pm or 8am - 8 pm. After that take the food away from them. Only give them water through the night. plenty of fresh clean water.

    If you are able to let them free range you might put them out a few hours and make them forage and not eat so much feed. The foraging will make them exercise and will help strengthen their legs. The grass and bugs will give them more natural fiber and proteins and will help with the stress that causes their organs to give out early.
     

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