Processed my first bird today

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by steveo, Apr 5, 2009.

  1. steveo

    steveo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 9, 2007
    Poland, Maine
    We went out to the coop today to check on the layers and get some eggs. It was a nice day so we opened the door to the pen and everything was good. A couple of hours later my wife brought some food out for them and found one of the Rhode Island reds laying on the floor in the coop. I am not sure what happened but it looks like the bird might have knocked itself out on the perches due to all the excitement running in and out of the coop with the guineas going crazy. Anyways first the birds eyes were shut and then it tried to get up but could not. So I am not really sure what happened but I took it out and culled it. I did not want to waste such a nice bird so I scalded it in a lobster pot full of water at about 150 degrees and it was pretty easy to pluck. I then proceeded to butcher the bird and everything seemed to go pretty good for never doing this before. I have read all about it but this was the first time actually processing a bird. There was no fluids inside the bird so I am guessing it was not sick and it did look very healthy up until I found it on the floor.

    I am assuming it will be ok to eat this bird. It is about a year and a half old maybe two. The bird is in the refridgerator now. We have 25 meat birds in the brooder and this was good practice. After this experience I am going to pay to have my 25 meat birds processed. Processing was not a huge task but for $3 something a bird it will be well worth it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2009
  2. ticks

    ticks Pheasant Obsessed

    Apr 1, 2008
    The Sticks, Vermont
    I processed my first birds yesterday, they were ducks.
    They are simmering with rice and spices-
    jumbalya. I can't figure how to spell that though. [​IMG]
     
  3. wings

    wings Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2009
    Massachusetts
    I just had my rooster Blackie butchered today. Last time when I did it with my dad, it was too much of a hassle: much easier to bring to the butcher for 5 bucks. [​IMG]
     
  4. Scoop

    Scoop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 16, 2009
    Central PA
    My husband & I did our first culling last fall. We have an old cone that came with our farm so that made that first part of the job easy. I didn't actually do that first part yet if ya know what I mean, but I'm going to try to next time. I hunt so I don't have any problem gutting and butchering. It all comes naturally after a while. I just can't eat it the same day I do it. Sounds like you're off to a great start! Keep on keeping on!
     
  5. wings

    wings Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2009
    Massachusetts
    Your own chickens taste wayyyyyyyyyyy better than supermarket chickens, just because they're yours! [​IMG]
     
  6. columbiacritter

    columbiacritter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 7, 2008
    Scappoose Oregon
    Waiting until later this week to eat the roo I processed this morning. Interested to see how he tastes.
     
  7. wings

    wings Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2009
    Massachusetts
    Quote:Usually they're a little tougher (because they actually USE their muscles [​IMG]), but they have had more flavor, from my experiences...
     
  8. greenthumb89

    greenthumb89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 30, 2008
    pulaski wisconsin
    Quote:Usually they're a little tougher (because they actually USE their muscles [​IMG]), but they have had more flavor, from my experiences...

    yes and no. meat birds ie cornish cross arent because they are butchered so young. but layers and roosters if left to grow over time are tougher, makes them the best for slow cooking recipes like chicken soup
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2009
  9. wings

    wings Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2009
    Massachusetts
    Quote:Usually they're a little tougher (because they actually USE their muscles [​IMG]), but they have had more flavor, from my experiences...

    yes and no. meat birds ie cornish cross arent because they are butchered so young. but layers and roosters if left to grow over time are tougher, makes them the best for slow cooking recipes like chicken soup

    Yup. I know. (I was just too lazy to write it all out... [​IMG])
     

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