Product question

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by BarredCometLaced, Oct 22, 2011.

  1. BarredCometLaced

    BarredCometLaced Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 10, 2011
    Northern NH
  2. zzGypsy

    zzGypsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 8, 2011
    what are you wanting to use it for?

    I've got big sheep, my rams are over 300 lbs and this table goes to 450, so weight-wise it would work, but ...
    I'm not sure what I'd use it for. for animals under a hundred fifty pounds it seems a bit much, too expensive and probably not ideal for smaller animals. I give most shots sub-q (state rules restrict giving IM injections in animals intended for meat market) and I'd think the narrow bar spacing on this would interfere significantly with getting that done.

    to trim their feet, we just set them on their behinds - although we're probably going to get one of these sheep chairs: http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=3daf63e1-e7e1-4ca9-8acf-deee23b46e2a
    or
    http://www.sheep101.info/201/handling.html
    or
    http://www.premier1supplies.com/detail.php?prod_id=86&cat_id=0&

    we
    use a sheep blocking stand if we need head restraint, for things like shots or wound treatment: http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=a69c68dd-3816-437d-a0b2-6284a65bcaea

    and
    we'll probably get some sheep head-gates this year... they' work for things like head restraint.

    mostly it just takes two of us to do anything we'd need to do, one to hold the sheep's head or support them on their behind, and the other to do whatever we're doing, vaccinate, drench, trim hooves, etc. with the sheep chair and a sheep head gate, I should be able to do most stuff without needing a second person, except perhaps on my largest rams.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2011
  3. BarredCometLaced

    BarredCometLaced Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Northern NH
    Well, the bars are all removable. I just though in a one man operation something like this would be useful in some way.
     
  4. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    I don't see why you'd ever need something like that with sheep. Just set them on their rumps and you can do anything you want to them. I used to handle full grown Boer goats by setting them on their rumps.
     
  5. zzGypsy

    zzGypsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    it is a fun piece of equipment... hope I didn't rain on your parade.

    I used to think I wanted a sheep table like that, but I've realized with a head gate and a sheep chair I probably could spend that money on something I'd use more, like a chute with a sorting gate, an even better stocked medicine cabinet, and a second stock dog...
    or maybe some more fencing...
    or maybe some more ewes...
    or I could use that money to hire a farm hand when we're shearing or trimming or medicating, for the next 10 times we do it...

    I like the idea of the tilt table, but the longer I have sheep the less I think I'd use it.

    now if it were draft horse size, I've got a horse I might use it on for shoeing... [​IMG]
     
  6. BarredCometLaced

    BarredCometLaced Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Haha, i just thought it was nifty. But your right, they probably don't need that. I don't have sheep, so still find it difficult to believe that they can easily be flipped on their back. I guess i will have to find myself a mentor if i do get some [​IMG]
     
  7. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Grifton NC
    find it difficult to believe that they can easily be flipped on their back

    Many of the wool breeds are so docile they just give up when you grab them.

    It's not that easy with all sheep, and it's not as safe as having equipment.

    Whether or not it's worth the cost depends on how many sheep you need to handle​
     
  8. zzGypsy

    zzGypsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    with the sheep chair, you just back them up until their hind legs hit the bottom bar, then back them up one more little bit and they'll "sit" in the hammock part of it. lift their chest and lay them back into the chair - feet up, all is good! mostly they don't fight if all 4 feet are clear of the ground. if they can feel a hoof on the ground, some of them will scramble to try to get up.

    to do it without a chair, stand with sheep facing your left, you're at it's shoulder. put your right leg behind their hind legs, your left forearm/hand at their chest under their neck, and your right hand on their butt. while pushing down a little on their butt with your right hand, using your left arm, back them up until they sit - your right leg will stop them from steping back so they'll put their rump down on the ground. then lift at the base of the neck/chest so they're fully up on their rump and lean their body weight against yours. I can do this with all but my big rams (for them, I need a second person).

    if they're fighters you can turn their nose to their shoulder before you back them up.

    pop on youtube, you're sure to find some video of sheep sheering - watching the pros do it is cool - they're very quick and smooth and it keeps the animal calm.

    ETA - whenever you're handling sheep you DO need to keep your knees BENT - a sheep coming at you is just about knee high and will take your knees out if you've got them locked, or get caught from the wrong direction.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2011

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