Production Red or RIR? and other

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by mustangsaguaro, Mar 14, 2011.

  1. mustangsaguaro

    mustangsaguaro Songster

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    I have a few birds have been wondering for quite a while what they are. I'm thinking one of them might be a production red. Can someone explain the difference between a so called production red and a true RIR? Here are some pics.

    [​IMG]
    Is this one a RIR or some type of mix w/ a RIR? Note she has a rosecomb. I have another one that looks exactly like her, but she has a single comb and it flops over a bit. So am a bit baffled as to what they are.

    [​IMG]
    when I got this hen which was about 3yrs ago the guy told me she was a phoenix. But I'm not so sure. She lays a very light creme colored egg. And does go broody one or 2x a year.

    [​IMG]
    this is the hen that I'm thinking is the production red not a RIR.
     
  2. cubalaya

    cubalaya Crowing

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    the first one is a rose comb rir and not a very good one.
    second one could be a phoenix or a leghorn.
    third one looks like a buff orpington.
     
  3. Kaceyx73

    Kaceyx73 Chirping

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    Production, or hatchery reds hens will range from a buff to a dark mahogany. As far as I know, Heritage RIR hens will mostly medium brown to mahogany. There is a difference in egg laying, but the major difference lies in the roosters.
    These are my production reds. If you look closely, you will see a couple of lighter ones, and a couple darker mahogany, and the rest a nice medium brown.
    [​IMG]
    BTW, the orange rooster isn't production red or Heritage RIR, but is my dominant roo, and a helluva good looking rooster.
    [​IMG]

    Here is my production red rooster, Mr. Roo. If you notice, when the light hits him just right, you can see a dark maroon sheen in some of his plumage. In a Heritage RIR that deep wine red color is solid, covering the whole body except for a black tail. If you have never seen one, they are truly striking. Go over to the breed forums and browse through the thread on Heritage RIRs. One of the guys on there has some absolutely gorgeous birds, with lots of pics.
    [​IMG]

    One of the other trademarks of the RIR breeds is the "brick" shaped body. Mr. Roo has the overall shape, but its not perfect. The back should be flat, and the keel bone should poke out enough to give the front a flat shape. Mr. roo is a proud boy, but he usually carries his tail to high for the Heritage standards. I still think he's growing up to be a fine bird, and I'm quite proud of him.
    [​IMG]

    There is a rosecomb version of the RIR, but I hadn't heard of a production red with a rose comb. Maybe someone else can answer that. She could be a cross, but no telling.
    The second one looks like some variety of bantam, and I'm not very familiar with them. If you were confused by the "brick" shaped body, look at the your second pic. That little guy has that shape, just picture a rectangle over his body and you will see it.
    My guess on the third one is buff orpington, but just a guess. If that's a hen, she has a very impressive comb for a girl.
     
  4. Kaceyx73

    Kaceyx73 Chirping

    157
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    Dec 14, 2010
    Production, or hatchery reds hens will range from a buff to a dark mahogany. As far as I know, Heritage RIR hens will mostly medium brown to mahogany. There is a difference in egg laying, but the major difference lies in the roosters.
    These are my production reds. If you look closely, you will see a couple of lighter ones, and a couple darker mahogany, and the rest a nice medium brown.
    [​IMG]
    BTW, the orange rooster isn't production red or Heritage RIR, but is my dominant roo, and a helluva good looking rooster.
    [​IMG]

    Here is my production red rooster, Mr. Roo. If you notice, when the light hits him just right, you can see a dark maroon sheen in some of his plumage. In a Heritage RIR that deep wine red color is solid, covering the whole body except for a black tail. If you have never seen one, they are truly striking. Go over to the breed forums and browse through the thread on Heritage RIRs. One of the guys on there has some absolutely gorgeous birds, with lots of pics.
    [​IMG]

    One of the other trademarks of the RIR breeds is the "brick" shaped body. Mr. Roo has the overall shape, but its not perfect. The back should be flat, and the keel bone should poke out enough to give the front a flat shape. Mr. roo is a proud boy, but he usually carries his tail to high for the Heritage standards. I still think he's growing up to be a fine bird, and I'm quite proud of him.
    [​IMG]

    There is a rosecomb version of the RIR, but I hadn't heard of a production red with a rose comb. Maybe someone else can answer that. She could be a cross, but no telling.
    The second one looks like some variety of bantam, and I'm not very familiar with them. If you were confused by the "brick" shaped body, look at the your second pic. That little guy has that shape, just picture a rectangle over his body and you will see it.
    My guess on the third one is buff orpington, but just a guess. If that's a hen, she has a very impressive comb for a girl.
     
  5. Firearia

    Firearia Songster

  6. ChickenWisperer

    ChickenWisperer Songster

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    I'm doubtful to say the first one is a rosecomb RIR. I say mix.

    The second is probably a bad quality/hatchery quality silver phoenix. Silver leghorns, from what I gather, are rare.

    The third is some kind of mutt. Definitely NOT a buff orpington, and too buff to be a production RIR.
     
  7. 6redhens

    6redhens In the Brooder

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    I'd say the first is production red, idk second but maybe the third could be a golden comet or some gold/red sexlink. A production red is basically, from what I've researched, a RIR mixed with a leghorn or another breed to make them produce more eggs.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2017

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