1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Proper feed question

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by new2chickens307, Jun 21, 2016.

  1. new2chickens307

    new2chickens307 Just Hatched

    21
    0
    12
    Jun 12, 2016
    We have one hen who was hatched in February and 4 younger birds hatched in May. We have been feeding a medicated chick starter thus far and have had to treat with Corid for coccidia. They just finished there third treatment (reoccuring bloody poop) and all seem healthy. It is time to buy another back of feed. My question is stick with the chick starter? Is that good enough for the older hen who should begin laying soon? Would a laying feed be too much for the younger birds? Please help me out with my conundrum if you have any suggestions, thanks[​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

    21,681
    2,617
    466
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Layer feed (approx. 4% calcium) is too much for 2 month old birds. That is not an option.

    One shouldn't really be using medicated feed (amprolium) and also treating with Corid (more amprolium).

    Medicated feed is a preventative to keep the population of the coccidia protozoa low by starving them of thiamine.
    Corid is for the outbreak of coccidiosis. Medicated feed usually won't treat the condition so a heavier dose is needed.

    Usually, keeping bedding bone dry and feeders full is all that is needed to prevent coccidiosis.
    Coccidia can't replicate without a moist environment.

    Other things can cause bloody diarrhea like blackhead and campylobacteriosis. Are there other symptoms?
    Are they thin?

    I would switch to a grower or all flock feed (1% calcium) and if you have more problems, treat with Corid again.
    Have you had a fecal sample read to see if that is the problem?
    Keep in mind that all outdoor animals will have some coccidia in their intestine.
     
  3. new2chickens307

    new2chickens307 Just Hatched

    21
    0
    12
    Jun 12, 2016
    First of all thank you for responding.
    We have had fecals performed and they were negative for coccidia but chicks were not improving and we kept losing them (6 passed away), vet had us treat with Corid. After treatment we supplemented water with probiotics and electrolyte vitiamin powder. We were directed to treat for 5 days two weeks off then another 3 days. At the beginning of second treatment another 2 passed away.
    Things started looking up, we moved them to a new coop with all new bedding/ feeders/waters. Another bird came down with bloody poo. So we began another round of Corid, just finished that two days ago.

    Vet advised to keep feeding medicated feed[​IMG] I never questioned that.
    Should I repeat Corid again in 2 weeks?
    Thank you for your input again.
     
  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

    7,252
    1,549
    356
    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    If it's not coccidia, amprolium isn't the answer. The medicated feed might still be a good idea, but if you can get a diagnosis that would be best, if you are still having deaths. If the survivors are doing well, continue the chick feed, and don't feed them the layer. Mary
     
  5. new2chickens307

    new2chickens307 Just Hatched

    21
    0
    12
    Jun 12, 2016
    Is that adequate nutrition for the older hen?
     
  6. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

    21,681
    2,617
    466
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    I agree in that I doubt your problem is coccidiosis.

    Since you have been losing birds, your best bet would be to send one to your state poultry lab for necropsy. That's the only way you'll know what the problem is and a way forward.

    If a fecal sample didn't show a coccidia problem then stop treating for it.

    If you tell us what state you're in we could direct you to a place for necropsy.

    Any time you lose more than one, especially in short order, that's time for lab work.

    Non-medicated starter feed would be good nutrition for a pullet. Your bird isn't an older hen, she's a point of lay pullet.
    She doesn't need layer feed till she starts laying eggs. She doesn't even need it then if you provide another calcium source.
    I would start putting out some oyster shell in a separate container so she can eat it if she feels the need. A little pre-lay calcium would do her good.
     
  7. new2chickens307

    new2chickens307 Just Hatched

    21
    0
    12
    Jun 12, 2016
    We are in Wyoming, in the event that we do lose another it would be great to find an answer. The local vet seemed confident that the bloody stool, despite a positive fecal, was coccidiosis. I have been questioning that since we lost more birds following treatment.
    Again thank you for the feed recommendations. One last question will oyster shell be alright for the younger hens if they eat it?
     
  8. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

    21,681
    2,617
    466
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Chicks won't eat oyster shell. Or at least not enough to matter. Birds don't eat it unless they feel the need for more calcium.
    Wyoming is a big state. At any rate, here's your lab, it's in Laramie.
    Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory
    1174 Snowy Range Road
    Laramie, Wyoming 82070
    Phone: 307-766-9929 Fax 307-721-2051
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by