Property fence options

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by DeRock89, Apr 6, 2018.

  1. DeRock89

    DeRock89 In the Brooder

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    Im looking to fence my property in and I’m on a tight budget. I’m looking for opinions on a few different fencing options.

    I’m looking into using welded wire, Redbrand Kennel fence, or no climb horse fence. These are the options in my budget, horse fence being barely.

    The big considerations is it will run along a hilly environment and I need smaller holes so I don’t want to use field fence.

    Welded wire seems the most attractive because it would be the cheapest, but a lot of other posts have made me nervous about it because it allegedly has a horrible lifespan. I’m also wondering if due to its rigidity, it would be hard to use with hills. Is welded wire really that horrible?

    The Redbrand kennel fence looks awesome, the holes are 2”x2” and it’s woven knotted so I assume would take longer to rust. The problem with this is it looks like it’s only orderable and I don’t see it available at any local dealers. I really don’t want to have 800 pounds of fencing shipped to my house and on top of that, I don’t know the exact amount I need.

    Horse fence has smaller holes but it looks so much more expensive then the other two. Tractor supply has it for $250 bucks for a 100 foot roll. Welded wire is 119 dollars for 100 foot and the Redbrand kennel is 150 dollars for 100 feet. I’m looking at all 72” heights.
     
  2. Farmer Connie

    Farmer Connie All My Friends Have Hoofs

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    Don't believe everything they say. For every 1 positive review, there will be 50 negative reviews. People rant more than praise. Happy people go with the flow and disgruntled people go to the internet and spread slander as a form of letting off steam.
    I have some welded wire fencing over 10 yrs old. No rust and is great condition. It works well over hill conditions. You need a really good fencing stretcher and a come-a-long for good tension. H-brace and concrete your corners.
    There are different gauges and coatings as well. Do your home work before buying. Redbrand makes a welded wire fence that is really super hard to cut and another that cuts without effort. We have both. The thicker gauge takes a great effort to stretch. The thinner gauge needs a coral board run along the top to keep it from becoming distorted.
    Rural King has the lowest prices on Redbrand BTW.
     
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  3. DeRock89

    DeRock89 In the Brooder

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    Rural king is an online store isn’t it? I don’t know about ordering 800 pounds of fence through the mail. Wouldn’t you pay a lot on shipping, and I doubt the regular postal service can deliver it either.

    I remember when I was a kid, my dad got reclaimed tin roofing from chicken houses and redid our roof with it. It had rust and he used this silvery thick rubbery paint that came in a metal 5 gallon bucket. I have no idea what that stuff is based on my childhood memories, but I wonder if it did start rusting, and that stuff still exists, if it could be painted with it?

    Did you use metal T posts or treated wood roud posts? It looks like there’s only a 2 dollar difference between the two. I assume from looking at pictures that if the t posts are used then the spacing has to be closer together and I think maybe that would mitigate the 2 dollar savings, BUT would means having to buy more cement and gravel. Which is really better?
     
  4. Farmer Connie

    Farmer Connie All My Friends Have Hoofs

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    WE have 3 Rural King stores in our driving range.
    Tin roofing is different than wire. Wire has been treated with zinc or galvanized.
    Corners MUST be wood posts and H-braced for tension. T-post can be spaced 8 foot centers. Add another H-brace for every 100 lnft of fencing.
    I suggest you learn the basics of fence stretching before you take on this task. The lifespan of the fencing is dictated by the quality of installation just as much as the quality of the material it's self.

     
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  5. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging

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    We have installed a mile (literally!) of fencing here, and I do have opinions!
    What are you fencing for? How high? How many feet total? How many gates?
    Woven wire is better than welded, for sure. The 2"x4" horse fencing is an excellent product, but might not be the only choice. Red Brand also makes a 4"x4" woven wire 'goat fence' that's fine for many critters and much less expensive than the horse fencing. It's also lighter and easier to handle.
    We have horse fencing with electric tape or rope on top for the horses and cattle, and goat fencing as part of our chicken and dog fencing, again with electric on the top.
    For chickens, youngsters can get through the goat fencing, but not adult standard birds.
    It keeps big dogs out too.
    TSC and many local farm stores stock Red Brand; it would be expensive to ship!
    There's an excellent book about fencing and I don't remember it's name, but it's something like 'Fencing for Farm& Ranch' ???
    Mary
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2018
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  6. DeRock89

    DeRock89 In the Brooder

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    I’m going to to 72” high. I want to minimize that chance of escape as much as possible.
    It’s to keep chickens, ducks, and small dogs in. I’m confident my smallest dog could get trough an opening 4”x4”. I won’t need gates because I’m going to do a privacy fence on the front side.

    It’s going to be about 660 feet total. About 150 will be privacy fence. So around 500 feet of the other.

    I’m learning how the stretching process works and one thing I really want to figure out is how to deal with uneven ground. My whole yard is one big decline, then level for awhile, and then an incline. I would think that when I stretch it over say a small valley, the fence is going to be up in the air... how do I deal with this?

    Also, I can’t use a tractor or vehicle to anchor off the stretcher. If there is no tree in direct line, what do I anchor to?
     
  7. RNratchet

    RNratchet In the Brooder

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    Do you have a pickup truck (even one that you could borrow)? I used my truck as an anchor to stretch HT woven fencing. Alternatively, I saw an install video on Youtube where they built an extra, temporary H brace for that purpose (seems like an awful lot of work though). If you have a lot of dips you will have some areas where the fence is going to be off the ground, although you'll be stapling as you go along and can raise and lower the fence a little (assuming you're using woven wire).
    Chris
     
  8. jthornton

    jthornton Crowing

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    An A frame boom can give you the height you need to stretch a fence and the tension wire can be connected to a stake and a come a long at the top.

    JT
     
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  9. totalloser

    totalloser In the Brooder

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    If you need an anchor to stretch from and nothing is there lay a picket system using webbing and concrete form stakes. Properly set up, picket systems will hold better than anything on wheels, and most things on tracks.
     
  10. DeRock89

    DeRock89 In the Brooder

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    Is there any videos or articles you know of showing this?
     

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