Protein in eggs - Dietitian? / diet question?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by NHMountainMan, Nov 12, 2019.

  1. NHMountainMan

    NHMountainMan Crowing

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    I know that you can boost Omega 3 in eggs with special feed or adding flaxseed to their diet. I'm in need of a high protein diet. Details / background of my health challenges are in my profile. Does anyone know of a way to safely increase the protein in eggs? Avg. large egg has 6 grams of protein.

    Prior to cancer - I was 205 lbs of relatively in shape muscle. While sick, I dropped to 160 lbs. Following treatment and surgeries, and now remission - I'm back to 200 lbs. But I've lost a ton of muscle mass, and lets just say the weight is distributed a bit differently!

    I've started physical therapy and had a dietitian consult. They want me on a 3000 calorie/day diet, 40% protein, 35% carb and 25% fat - in combination with PT / training. At 4 calories per gram of protein, that mean 300 gram of protein daily, which is a huge struggle without protein shakes, which I would prefer not to use for more than 50 grams or so. I also cannot eat anything high in iron (red meat.) So I'm wondering if I can boost the protein content of the eggs my chickens lay.

    I haven't been able to find anything about it on google searches. Hoping someone in this community may have an answer or idea.

    Thanks all!
     
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  2. FortCluck

    FortCluck Free Ranging

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    I haven't been able to find anything on increasing protein, but I do know that duck eggs have more protein.

    I'm not sure if you can add ducks to your flock, but it might be worth looking into.
     
  3. FortCluck

    FortCluck Free Ranging

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    And congrats on being in remission!
     
  4. Wee Farmer Sarah

    Wee Farmer Sarah Free Ranging

    I would be careful with the flaxseed and trying to increase the protein in your chickens eggs. Have you considered increasing your fish consumption? Shellfish like clams and shrimp are good sources of protein and Omega 3. If you are not lactose intolerant, old fashioned cows milk and cheese are great sources of protein as well as nuts. The Mayo clinic has a website that is very helpful
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating
     
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  5. FortCluck

    FortCluck Free Ranging

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    Since I am plant-based I will give you some of my protein choices since I don't eat meat...

    Nuts, beans, peas, chickpeas, tofu, lentils, quinoa, chia seeds, nut butters, hemp seeds, broccoli, and oats.

    I do protein shakes too, but I would rather consume food because shakes don't fill me up or satisfy me.

    Meat chickens would be another thing you could look into since you cannot do red meat. Quail are also another meat that you could look into. Quail are a lot easier to raise and process.
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    A few years back I read about a guy that was trying to start a business of selling eggs enhanced by what the chickens ate. I can't remember the details, maybe giving them an oregano flavor by feeding them oregano. He was trying to flavor them. He was also trying to increase certain nutrients like they do with Omega's. One thing I specifically remember was calcium. He was trying to increase the calcium content of the eggs but it did not work, the shells got real hard though. The article did not mention the damage the extra calcium could do to their internal organs. I tried searching for it and could not find that article.

    I think you'd run into the same issue with protein. You would not get a higher percent protein per gram of egg, you'd get larger eggs. A larger egg will have more of everything, protein, fats, iron, and everything else an egg provides but that's just because the egg is bigger.

    Good luck on resolving your issues.
     
  7. NHMountainMan

    NHMountainMan Crowing

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    Thanks for the link- my treatment was coordinated by the
    Thanks - I love research and will look into it. I actually ended up at the Mayo clinic for diagnosis and designing the treatment plan. They were great. Then my care and treatment went to Dartmouth (they'd referred me to Mayo.) I have a problem with iron building up, so I need to stay on very low iron diet. I have blood "donations" done monthly to keep me on the fringe of anemia. Basically poultry, fish and pork. Shellfish (clams, oyster and scallops) are bottom feeders and accumulate iron - so they are prohibited. Also - top of the food chain fish (swordfish, tuna) are higher in iron. So we eat a lot of salmon (wild caught, as farmed fish have feed pellets including iron), haddock and shrimp. Nuts are great and have become my go to snack. But I am still needing multiple protein shakes - which often contain too much iron. So I ws hoping that perhaps putting my chickens on a higher protein diet might be an easy addition to my protein grams without having to eat more!

    I appreciate the advice. I will look at the link !
     
  8. NHMountainMan

    NHMountainMan Crowing

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    Thank you - 18 months so far!

    I am looking at adding more plant based protein to the mix - but they are so low in calories typically that it's hard to get enough. Thanks for the ideas. I agree on protein shakes - not only are they not filling, it just doesn't feel natural to me - plays they almost always add iron.

    I hadn't thought about duck eggs. I wasn't planning on getting ducks, but I used to do a lot of duck hunting, and love the flavor of ducks and geese. I've never even tried a duck egg! It never crossed my mind to add different varieties of poultry. This is a really good idea. Thank you!
     
  9. NatJ

    NatJ Songster

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    I don't know if you already thought of this, but you could try eating more egg WHITES and giving the yolks to someone else (family, dog, chickens). The fat and iron are mostly in the yolks, while more than half of the protein is in the white. So you'd be getting more protein relative to the amount of calories and iron, which seems to be the current goal.

    A google search turns up the following info:
    egg white (33 grams)= 17 calories, 3.6 grams protein, no iron
    egg yolk (17 grams)= 55 calories, 2.7 grams protein, .5 mg iron

    I'm not saying egg yolks are bad, just that adding some extra whites to your diet may be easier than changing the diet of the hens in this case.
     
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  10. FortCluck

    FortCluck Free Ranging

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    I just added ducks to my flock, 3 Pekins and 1 Muscovy. I have three females and one male. I'm going to keep these in my layer flock and their offspring will be meat ducks... It's basically the same thing I am doing with my layer flock of chickens.

    Plant-based protein does have a lot less calories, but I feel so much better eating those since I have reactions to most meat. So far chicken is the only meat I can eat without getting sick.

    Duck eggs are richer and creamier according to my husband (I haven't tried them because I chickened out last time I made them). They are a lot bigger too so they keep you fuller longer. They are good to use for baking too, they add a richness to the baked goods. Duck eggs can't be overcooked because they turn rubbery. We like to make them runny, I guess over easy is what you would call it.
     

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